456.2 miles on one tank - Jeep Compass Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 03-16-2018, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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456.2 miles on one tank

Greetings everyone. I just returned from my work trip that I began on Tuesday. As promised here is a report on the trip in my '18 Jeep Compass Trailhawk:

Tuesday morning began cold, and unfortunately, with snow falling.... So much for a good weather trip. Oh well. I topped off the Compass before hitting the road at a gas station that is literally about 200 feet from the highway. I hit the road keeping to my mileage maximizing 55 mph, and keep the climate control on auto. As soon as I was comfortable, I kicked off the heated seat and wheel, and set about the 235ish mile drive to Cincinnati, OH., for my week of "classes". Snow would fall off and on until about Ashland, where it was beginning to stick. Fortunately, that belt of snow didn't last long and the weather finally cleared as the sun started coming up. Having the sun shade open on the sunroof allowed the interior to warm up enough for me to cut off the climate control, eliminating the HVAC load on the engine. As always I kept camped out in the right lane so that traffic could easily get around me, with only the occasional driver that refuses to not stare at their windshield wipers running up close before becoming aware of the fact they aren't the only one on the roads and passing.

Columbus, OH., came up soon enough and with it, the inevitable tailback that brought me down to about 10ish minutes of slow and go driving as the latter part of their morning commute did it's thing. Pushing on past Columbus, I resumed the 55mph pace and remained camped in the right lane, systematically clicking off the miles to Cincinnati. As I was reaching closer to my destination, the ODOT signs warned of the tunnel being closed on I-71 at the KY state line. I got caught up in that bit of traffic as I was exiting the highway to reach my destination downtown. Upon arrival at the hotel I was to stay at for the week, I let the valet park the vehicle where it remained until it was time to leave. The gas gauge was slightly above the 1/2 tank mark with the computer showing 33 mpg on the tank average.

Fast forward to today, and it's time to come home. The valet retrieves the car and gets out leaving it running. I jump on him to shut it off until I'm ready to leave to not idle away any fuel. I get loaded, restart the Jeep and head straight back to the highway. My trip home is the same as the way out - minus morning snow. I keep the climate control off, as well as the seat and wheel heaters to minimize electrical load on the alternator. As with the trip south, I keep the cruise control locked on 55 mph for the return trip. Columbus shows up ahead soon enough and just like with the drive south, I managed to find some slow and go traffic negotiating the urban stretch of the drive. The DTE and the GPS kept shifting from 35 miles worth of range to about 50 miles excess distance available, so I kept running north. Keeping to the right as always, I simply sit back and let music play while I play math games in my head as to how much cushion I have. Eventually the MPG meter shifted past 34 mpg and kept very gradually adding to that number, and maxed out right on the 35 mpg mark.

The low fuel light and blue part of the fuel gauge turned red just as I got off of I-71 to I-76 west of Akron, OH. By this time, I felt comfortable that I would make the drive home. Traffic however, would try its best to test my confidence. Construction just west of Akron had heavy traffic, causing me to have to repeatedly adjust my speed, and stole the 35 mpg off of the DIC. Pushing through it and following I-76 into town. The second stretch of construction that I was going to have to drive through had traffic totally stopped, so I had to quickly divert to surface streets to get around the mess. I get back onto the highway to finish the final few miles, and pull up to the gas station with the DIC showing as pictured below. The calculator would actually show slightly better than the DIC indicated at 35.06mpg, vs. the DIC's 34.8. Either way, I'm pleased with the result. I also included a pic of the fuel receipt below.
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-16-2018, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Wolfy View Post
allowed the interior to warm up enough for me to cut off the climate control, eliminating the HVAC load on the engine.
Huh? I don't understand what this does. How does not having the heat on give you better MPG?

Also, if you're driving at 55 mph I think that might be why you get good MPG. But I'll pass on that one. As Sammy Hagar put it, I can't drive 55.

'18 Compass 4x4 Sport 6-speed manual
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post #3 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
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Huh? I don't understand what this does. How does not having the heat on give you better MPG?

Also, if you're driving at 55 mph I think that might be why you get good MPG. But I'll pass on that one. As Sammy Hagar put it, I can't drive 55.
Yes, the HVAC system adds electrical and AC load to the engine. As with all things, this is not free energy. The added load from the AC compressor on the engine, and the alternator require more fuel to be put into the engine. I will see an immediate 2 mpg bump in the instantaneous MPG on the DIC when I shut if off, and another 1 - 2 mpg increase when I shut off the heated wheel and seats.
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post #4 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 01:23 AM
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Hmm that's interesting. I've heard about the air-conditioning taking horsepower away from the engine. I always thought the heat was produced as waste from the engine, and didn't know it took any more gasoline burned to deliver it to the passenger compartment. I'll have to try this and see if I can improve the MPG, now that it has begun to warm up in my neck of the woods.

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post #5 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 02:12 AM
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Way to go Wolfy it is easy to see why in our country's interest in reserving fuel why the national speed limit was set at 55 MPH back in the day the science does not lie! Sadly as joninpa says I would have a hard time driving 55 in a 70 zone. Heck I have a hard time doing 70 in a 70 zone I just have to remind myself why we got a little Jeep Compass instead of another Suburban which gets crappy MPG but the difference in fuel use from 55 to 85 is not as huge as it is in the Jeep. The 5.3 just hums along at 85 showing off the fact that it is not working at all. But at 13-15 MPG it is all bad compared to the Jeeps MPG even at 70. lol


joninpa we often don't think about alternator and the effect it has on engine load. Sometimes depending on electrical load,battery size and engine size/torque characteristics it is not that bad other times it can be pretty bad. I had a 2wd Suzuki Sidekick once that lost 2-3 MPG driving at night vs driving in the day that was the cost of running the lights! The load was hard enough against the little engine that it would trigger a higher engine idle condition to bump RPM back out of the stall range.

Don't ask me about how MPG and top end speed are effected on an old Datsun pick-up truck by how many hands are stuck out into the airflow. The results and how we accomplished figuring that one out were really scary!
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 03:23 AM Thread Starter
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Hmm that's interesting. I've heard about the air-conditioning taking horsepower away from the engine. I always thought the heat was produced as waste from the engine, and didn't know it took any more gasoline burned to deliver it to the passenger compartment. I'll have to try this and see if I can improve the MPG, now that it has begun to warm up in my neck of the woods.
The heat itself is waste. That said, when you siphon off more heat from the engine via blowing a fan on the heater core, you are once again pulling heat out of the engine, and energy will be expended to replace it. This is why you see a marked drop in fuel economy when it is very cold outside, vs. a mild day in the winter. Now, the heat being drawn out of the cooling system for the heater in of itself probably won't amount to more than a rounding error. It's the electricity consumed by the fan that is the draw. Think back in the high school physics class where the teacher makes you hand crank a generator to light up a simple incandescent bulb. Now multiply that work by an entire vehicle's electrical demands. There is a reason why the alternators are rated in excess of 100 amps in most modern cars.
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post #7 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 03:26 AM Thread Starter
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Way to go Wolfy it is easy to see why in our country's interest in reserving fuel why the national speed limit was set at 55 MPH back in the day the science does not lie! Sadly as joninpa says I would have a hard time driving 55 in a 70 zone. Heck I have a hard time doing 70 in a 70 zone I just have to remind myself why we got a little Jeep Compass instead of another Suburban which gets crappy MPG but the difference in fuel use from 55 to 85 is not as huge as it is in the Jeep. The 5.3 just hums along at 85 showing off the fact that it is not working at all. But at 13-15 MPG it is all bad compared to the Jeeps MPG even at 70. lol


joninpa we often don't think about alternator and the effect it has on engine load. Sometimes depending on electrical load,battery size and engine size/torque characteristics it is not that bad other times it can be pretty bad. I had a 2wd Suzuki Sidekick once that lost 2-3 MPG driving at night vs driving in the day that was the cost of running the lights! The load was hard enough against the little engine that it would trigger a higher engine idle condition to bump RPM back out of the stall range.

Don't ask me about how MPG and top end speed are effected on an old Datsun pick-up truck by how many hands are stuck out into the airflow. The results and how we accomplished figuring that one out were really scary!

LOL yeah I admit that it can be difficult to do, especially out west where you can spend an entire day looking at nothing. Still, I just set the cruise, enjoy the Sirius service, and make a game out of the mileage display. I've had two hybrid electric cars (1st gen Prius, and first gen Escape), plus a Chevy Volt in my past. It has become something of a habit.
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-17-2018, 03:48 PM
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LOL yeah I admit that it can be difficult to do, especially out west where you can spend an entire day looking at nothing. Still, I just set the cruise, enjoy the Sirius service, and make a game out of the mileage display. I've had two hybrid electric cars (1st gen Prius, and first gen Escape), plus a Chevy Volt in my past. It has become something of a habit.





I'm working on getting there I have pulled down near 30 MPG on my lifted Chevy Tracker with a 2.0 auto put it usually runs mid to low 20s depending on where up in these mountains I'm going. My problem getting the best MPG is driving efficiently constantly. I find it has a lot to do with my mood on any given day. I usally do not drive faster to try to save time it is most often about playing around as I love to drive. Maybe one day I'll grow up a little more but not counting on it!

All this goes to show particularly with something like a decent sized compact SUV and 4 cylinder engine you have to work and think a lot about how to get the best MPG out of it that is the nature of the beast. That is one reason I keep my instant MPG set as the big part of the cluster display not only do I try to keep the bars up and numbrs up it also reminds me to try to sit back and chill life is not a race. But that big checkered flag that comes up on the GPS when you reach your destination says otherwise. LOL

I do have have to say I called it on these Compasses being able to break 30 MPG in a post I made on another thread. I could see from my results of watching MPG at different speeds and terrain that if someone dropped the speed and really focused on getting good MPG that breaking 30 would be possible as I ran mine at 60-65 and was getting 28 in rolling terrain over a many miles and we were not sparing the climate control. I'm almost betting even running the climate control at 55 MPH on mostly level ground breaking 30 MPG on an interstate would not be hard at all.
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post #9 of 17 Old 05-26-2018, 03:11 PM
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Again, Americans presuming that everything was made for them and their way of things.

All of the drivetrain components for these vehicles were designed to be ''global'' ones. Read: everywhere but here in America. And applicable to here if absolutely need be.

Firstly: The ''regular'' petrol in any other western nation STARTS at about 95 octane (most often than not in ethanol-free form to boot), and only varies upward from there. With ''premium'' starting at 98 and going up. The engines are designed with that in mind. And in-building to the computer fuel-mapping and timing systems the ability to modify the engine's performance to match Americans' detrimentally (and intentionally) produced/marketed JUNK fuel.

If you run ANYTHING other than what is ''premium'' in a North American market in these rigs, their mileage is going to suffer horribly. The factory MPG ratings are not calculated with said poor fuel at all btw.

Secondly: The most common legal highway speed limits in western markets anwhere but America translate out to roughly 55mph and/or 75mph. And you will find that the MP platform vehicles (read: 17-up compasses, and all renegades) perform most efficiently in terms of highway mileage when driven at one of these two speeds. While finding trouble getting in to any groove between or outside of them. Regardless of whether the rig has the standard or trailhawk gearing.

if you feed, use and drive the vehicle as designed (like the smart riginal poster on this thread), you will win every time.

Good on you by the way sir.

My lifted 16 Renegade trailhawk on LT225/75R17 Coopers gets 34mpg on the freeway (at 55 or 75) all day long by the way. And 23-24mpg around town. I have also never run anything but 94+ octane in it, and hit available fuel stops offering ethanol-free fuels where and when ever I can as well.
You may also run synthetic oil in the engines for a touch more efficiency (as I do as well). Do not use 0w-20 synth though. It is just too thin. It does not allow the engine to carry away heat properly, and the hydraulic timing solenoids are not designed for such a consistency, and do not perform like they think they should be.
5w-20 synthetic however, is what you could call ''PH-balanced'' for our lovely little 2.4L world motors.

Stop screwing yourself over, and you won't have anything to complain about.
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post #10 of 17 Old 05-27-2018, 02:20 AM
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Should have shut of that music and played music from your phone (not plugged in). Wasted some fuel right there.
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post #11 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 03:12 PM
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@Mike Maxwell I cannot get behind a recommendation to use a different grade of oil than what the manufacture recommends. The manual says in no uncertain terms that 0W-20 is recommended. Unlike some vehicles I have had in the past, which list a couple grades based on temperature of your region, the manual for this car simply says 0W-20 across the board for all regions and environments. I would like to know what basis you have to make the statement:
Quote:
hydraulic timing solenoids are not designed for such a consistency
What you seem to be saying (without providing any evidence) is that the engineers allegedly built the engine for one grade of oil and then recommended another, which is a fairly ridiculous proposition. We're not talking about a new motor here either, the 2.4 is one of the longest standing engines I can think of and naturally its been tweaked and poked at over the years (like how we now have multi-air) but regardless, after all these years I think the engineers know pretty darn well how the core internals and oil work together on the 2.4.

Just to drive another nail in the coffin, the difference between 0W-20 and 5W-20 is nothing, other than at cold start. The operating temp viscosity of both of those grades is 20, period. They will function no different whatsoever once the engines are warmed up. So all you are proposing is that the engine should have more viscous (thicker) oil at cold startup, which makes no sense at all. This "heat" you worry about is non-existent at cold start, and as we already pointed out both oils are at a rating of 20 at operating temp so.. your position is without evidence and nonsensical.

I don't mean to be combative about it I just don't want other unwitting people to come here, read your opinion, and start putting the longevity of their motor at risk for no reason.


I'm not sure about your statements on fuel either, the manual dedicates no less than four pages to talk about fuel for the vehicle in the US and the short of it is that they simply recommend running normal 87 octane fuel, anywhere from 0 to 15% ethanol.

Actually on page 422 its worth noting the manual states "The use of premium gasoline is not recommended, as it will not provide any benefit over regular gasoline in these engines."

You are entitled to your opinion and recommending premium fuel isn't so bad as you are more just telling people to waste their money vs telling people to use the wrong grade of oil in their engine but still, I have to point it out for whoever may come here doing some reading in the future.

My personal opinion is that the engine would never know the difference between 0W-20 and 5W-20 unless talking about a vehicle being operated solely in an extremely cold climate which is not most of us, and even then I doubt you could measure much difference in overall wear until about the 100,000 mile mark, but its just the principle and the protection of the warranty that I am thinking about. If I accidentally bought and ran 5W-20 in my Jeep tomorrow and realized it a day later I would not even bother to change it out, the differences are virtually nothing especially now that it is summer, but I would not run 5W continuously on purpose and brag to Jeep about it because I don't want them to have any excuse not to honor my warranty out to the last day or mile, thats all.
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Last edited by arudlang; 05-30-2018 at 07:26 PM.
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post #12 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 05:13 PM
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Actually on page 422 its worth nothing the manual states "The use of premium gasoline is not recommended, as it will not provide any benefit over regular gasoline in these engines."
Bingo! Saw this myself the first day I bought my compass.
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post #13 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 05:42 PM Thread Starter
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Bingo! Saw this myself the first day I bought my compass.
I buy it to avoid ethanol
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post #14 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 05:57 PM
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I was thinking about the fuel grade thing then I realized where some of the confusion is. Years and years ago it made a little more sense to run premium fuels in low compression low performance engines because these fuels were the only ones that got the additive cleaning packages. So you might find more milage and better performance in engines that did not require higher octane not because of the higher octane but because of simply having a cleaner fuel delivery system and engine.

But today all grades of fuel get additive packages to one way or the other help keep engines cleaner and performing better. Some additive packages even claim to be formulated for better MPGs. So yes maybe back in the day using premium fuel in everything made sense but not today here in the US at least.
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post #15 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 06:46 PM
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Again, Americans presuming that everything was made for them and their way of things.

All of the drivetrain components for these vehicles were designed to be ''global'' ones. Read: everywhere but here in America. And applicable to here if absolutely need be.

Firstly: The ''regular'' petrol in any other western nation STARTS at about 95 octane (most often than not in ethanol-free form to boot), and only varies upward from there. With ''premium'' starting at 98 and going up. The engines are designed with that in mind. And in-building to the computer fuel-mapping and timing systems the ability to modify the engine's performance to match Americans' detrimentally (and intentionally) produced/marketed JUNK fuel.

If you run ANYTHING other than what is ''premium'' in a North American market in these rigs, their mileage is going to suffer horribly. The factory MPG ratings are not calculated with said poor fuel at all btw.

Secondly: The most common legal highway speed limits in western markets anwhere but America translate out to roughly 55mph and/or 75mph. And you will find that the MP platform vehicles (read: 17-up compasses, and all renegades) perform most efficiently in terms of highway mileage when driven at one of these two speeds. While finding trouble getting in to any groove between or outside of them. Regardless of whether the rig has the standard or trailhawk gearing.

if you feed, use and drive the vehicle as designed (like the smart riginal poster on this thread), you will win every time.

Good on you by the way sir.

My lifted 16 Renegade trailhawk on LT225/75R17 Coopers gets 34mpg on the freeway (at 55 or 75) all day long by the way. And 23-24mpg around town. I have also never run anything but 94+ octane in it, and hit available fuel stops offering ethanol-free fuels where and when ever I can as well.
You may also run synthetic oil in the engines for a touch more efficiency (as I do as well). Do not use 0w-20 synth though. It is just too thin. It does not allow the engine to carry away heat properly, and the hydraulic timing solenoids are not designed for such a consistency, and do not perform like they think they should be.
5w-20 synthetic however, is what you could call ''PH-balanced'' for our lovely little 2.4L world motors.

Stop screwing yourself over, and you won't have anything to complain about.
Bla-Bla-Bla-Bla.......only 1 major problem with your 95 octane & up , high hill ! HIGHER OCTANE BURNS FASTER ! OPPS!
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post #16 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 07:14 PM
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Bla-Bla-Bla-Bla.......only 1 major problem with your 95 octane & up , high hill ! HIGHER OCTANE BURNS FASTER ! OPPS!

Actually you're wrong higher octane burns slower and is more resistant to ignite when hitting very hot surfaces inside the engine like the edge of valves and such.


https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2014/0...-priced-fuels/

"Higher octane gas is processed through additional steps that further refine the blend and cause it to burn more slowly than lower octanes."
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post #17 of 17 Old 05-30-2018, 09:03 PM
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Bla-Bla-Bla-Bla.......only 1 major problem with your 95 octane & up , high hill ! HIGHER OCTANE BURNS FASTER ! OPPS!
yeah, what the poster below you said. Higher octane burns slower and thus for longer (also creating more heat as a byproduct).

I relish having to be stuck in a country where the average education level lay somewhere about the 6th grade.

I would also like to thank you for perceiving my explaining the engineering behind the engine and drivetrain in your car as ''high horsed''. Which is consistent with the prevailing anti-education and anti-intellectual culture in this nation. I also fear having the be on the road with people as willfully ignorant as yourself.
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