Engine "Start/Stop" - Page 2 - Jeep Compass Forum
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post #31 of 59 Old 02-08-2019, 09:30 PM
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@JeepCares: I'm curious as to why you do not offer the auto start-stop on the manual transmission (which is a pretty standard option on manuals in Europe). Could it ever be possible as an after market upgrade?
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post #32 of 59 Old 02-18-2019, 05:18 AM
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My daughter just bought a 2019 Jeep Compass. The first thing I noticed was the Stop/Start feature which I personally found to be annoying. I am retired from Chrysler's Service division so I wanted some basic understanding of this new system. First if you want to disable the system there is an off/on switch but the problem there is you have to reset it every time you cycle the vehicle stop/start switch. OK how do you disable it permanently, some people disengage the hood ajar switch, but that may create other fault codes and problems. With this system there are 2 batteries in your car, the one we are all used to seeing, the large 12 volt battery that powers everything while the vehicle is running down the road. When you stop and the stop/start system kicks in and shuts the engine down all you electrical systems that are still on, radio, heater fan, dash lights, headlights etc are being powered by the small auxiliary battery. There is a jumper wire that connects the primary battery to the secondary battery. If that jumper wire is disconnected your computer will see that and will not allow the start/stop system to function. The down side to this procedure is that you will get the little warning light on the dash permanently displayed. There are some companies which are making a plug in that will disable the stop/start system but I'm not sure if any have been developed for the 2019 products as of yet. For me I think I will simply get in the habit of turning the system off with the dash button every time I start the car.
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post #33 of 59 Old 02-23-2019, 10:50 PM
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It's facinating how much people hate systems that actually save them money. I was annoyed when mine quit working. I got rather used to the silence of an engine off at a traffic light. Last fall, I was stuck in some serious traffic due to a fatality on the interstate. It legitimately saved me a lot of fuel not burned sitting and going nowhere. It works, saves money, and is not so gradually becoming standard fare across all cars. I say get used to it, and don't look for ways to cost yourself more at the pump.
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post #34 of 59 Old 02-24-2019, 01:07 PM
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The START-STOP system does not save fuel. On the contrary. Besides, it destroys the battery and starter!
post #35 of 59 Old 02-25-2019, 06:53 AM
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The START-STOP system does not save fuel. On the contrary. Besides, it destroys the battery and starter!
On the contrary. I've noticed a 1 - 2 mpg improvement in my fuel economy with the system on vs off. I fall into the category of roughly 60% city driving. Given that the system is designed with a heavy duty starter and an auxiliary battery, it does not "destroy" either component. The issues people have been having here have to do with software and sensor problems, not starters and batteries.
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post #36 of 59 Old 02-25-2019, 08:18 AM
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On the contrary. I've noticed a 1 - 2 mpg improvement in my fuel economy with the system on vs off. I fall into the category of roughly 60% city driving. Given that the system is designed with a heavy duty starter and an auxiliary battery, it does not "destroy" either component. The issues people have been having here have to do with software and sensor problems, not starters and batteries.
Yeah start/stop systems have a different type of starter that can handle frequent crankings without any issues, their life expectancies are not any shorter than a regular starter. Battery is also divided in to two smaller batteries to reduce the load on the battery. Overall, idling a car at a stop while stepping on the brake probably cause more wear to the torque converted, brakes, etc, than it causes to the starter.
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post #37 of 59 Old 02-25-2019, 05:32 PM
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It's facinating how much people hate systems that actually save them money. I was annoyed when mine quit working. I got rather used to the silence of an engine off at a traffic light. Last fall, I was stuck in some serious traffic due to a fatality on the interstate. It legitimately saved me a lot of fuel not burned sitting and going nowhere. It works, saves money, and is not so gradually becoming standard fare across all cars. I say get used to it, and don't look for ways to cost yourself more at the pump.
It really depends on the type of traffic that people drive in. If someone (like me) spends a lot of time in constant stop-and-go traffic, the stop/start system can be infuriating. I tracked mine about three weeks ago, and the system restarted my car 18 times in a half mile stretch of road in heavy traffic. Most of the shutdowns were for less than two seconds in length, and none exceeded 10 seconds. In that kind of traffic, the constant delay as the engine restarts just feels like severe hesitation and can lead to a very "jerky and surge-y" drive (as my wife put it). FCA should have given us a choice to set a delay on the stop/start system. Sure, there's a button to press, but for many of us this is an everyday thing and it can be very frustrating to have to hit the button every single day.

I'm an EE and solved the problem myself last weekend. I just soldered up a timer circuit that fires a momentary relay (it's slightly more complicated than that, but you get the idea) to trigger the circuit. The rewiring was minimal, but my button now "presses itself" five seconds after the car starts. Itstill works when I want it to, but it defaults to Off rather than on.

And no, before anyone asks, I'm not interested in selling the mod to anyone. I may diagram out the circuit and post photos of it so the more electronically inclined can try it themselves though.
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post #38 of 59 Old 02-25-2019, 10:35 PM
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It really depends on the type of traffic that people drive in. If someone (like me) spends a lot of time in constant stop-and-go traffic, the stop/start system can be infuriating. I tracked mine about three weeks ago, and the system restarted my car 18 times in a half mile stretch of road in heavy traffic. Most of the shutdowns were for less than two seconds in length, and none exceeded 10 seconds. In that kind of traffic, the constant delay as the engine restarts just feels like severe hesitation and can lead to a very "jerky and surge-y" drive (as my wife put it). FCA should have given us a choice to set a delay on the stop/start system. Sure, there's a button to press, but for many of us this is an everyday thing and it can be very frustrating to have to hit the button every single day.

I'm an EE and solved the problem myself last weekend. I just soldered up a timer circuit that fires a momentary relay (it's slightly more complicated than that, but you get the idea) to trigger the circuit. The rewiring was minimal, but my button now "presses itself" five seconds after the car starts. Itstill works when I want it to, but it defaults to Off rather than on.

And no, before anyone asks, I'm not interested in selling the mod to anyone. I may diagram out the circuit and post photos of it so the more electronically inclined can try it themselves though.
I do plenty of city driving as well. As with any system, you have to adapt to its function. It's not hard to adapt. It means doing the simple task of paying attention to your surroundings. Look ahead a couple of cars. Lift of foot just enough to cause start as the vehicle ahead of you begins to move. No more jerky, surgy driving.
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post #39 of 59 Old 02-26-2019, 01:18 AM
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I do plenty of city driving as well. As with any system, you have to adapt to its function. It's not hard to adapt. It means doing the simple task of paying attention to your surroundings. Look ahead a couple of cars. Lift of foot just enough to cause start as the vehicle ahead of you begins to move. No more jerky, surgy driving.
I'm an engineer. Good design is intuitive and adapts to the expectations of the user. Not the other way around. Humans are the most important element in any system, and good design puts the user's expectations and needs first. The FCA start/stop system is flawed in that it's overly obtrusive and alters the driving experience in a negative way. There are a million ways they could improve it (disable it in frequent stop/start situations, allow the user to adjust the stop delay, tie it into the collision control system to autostart when leading traffic moves, etc), but the current system is limited and forces the driver to adjust driving behaviors that have been established over a lifetime, and which are still valid in just about every other vehicle on the road. It's a neat engineering trick, but it makes the vehicle less user-friendly in my opinion. The very minor increase in fuel efficiency isn't worth the degraded driving experience.

To each their own though, and it's great that you like the feature. It's not for me, but it's also not a problem for me anymore. I have bent my machine to suit my will, and my own Stop/Start system now defaults to OFF
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post #40 of 59 Old 02-27-2019, 12:14 AM
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It's facinating how much people hate systems that actually save them money.
There is not the slightest chance for this system to save me so much as a fraction of a penny There is no way shutting down for one second and then firing right back up instantly is saving me any gas, and thats pretty much the only thing it does if I forget to shut the system off when I get in and go.

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I got rather used to the silence of an engine off at a traffic light.
Got used to the silence, eh? Must have also got used to the obnoxious CHUTHUTHUTHUTHTUHTUHT of restart and the glares of other drivers around you who have to hear your starter crank loudly and watch your headlights and taillights pulsing with the turning of the motor...

I know what part you really like, you enjoy the time when the motor is off at a stop because if its ON at a stop you have to listen to all your quarters in the cup holder chattering around, continuously shaken by the worlds most roughest idling four cylinder =P

The IDEA of ESS is fine. This particular implementation is not. It is garbage. I hope someday you get to ride in a car that does it right, you will see the difference.

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Last fall, I was stuck in some serious traffic due to a fatality on the interstate. It legitimately saved me a lot of fuel not burned sitting and going nowhere.
One rare example does not justify the shamelessly poor implementation of this particular system. I'm not concerned about a two mile crawl that happens maybe once or twice in the umpteen-hundred-thousand mile lifecycle of driving a given car.


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I'm an EE and solved the problem myself last weekend. I just soldered up a timer circuit that fires a momentary relay (it's slightly more complicated than that, but you get the idea) to trigger the circuit. The rewiring was minimal, but my button now "presses itself" five seconds after the car starts. Itstill works when I want it to, but it defaults to Off rather than on.
Ah man, you beat me to it! Thats what I was going to do before I decided to order up the stuff to try to go the programming route.

I still might go hardware route at some point, because my wife is very displeased with the lack of being able to set a couple of memory positions for the driver's power seat so we can easily switch back and forth.

So, want to expand your module out to also be a seat memory feature as well? =D If you are using something common like arduino I can probably help. I'm not an electrical engineer, but I am a software engineer who dabbles. Just a lack of free time keeps me from my many big ideas to un-fvckify this car...
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post #41 of 59 Old 02-27-2019, 01:45 AM
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Nah, my goal was "cheap". As in zero dollars cheap. I have various unused Arduino's sitting in a drawer, but I'd rather save them for other projects. Instead, I had some old components left over from another project and just soldered it all together. Didn't even put them on a board. It's just a pair of 555 timer circuits wired in series to act as delays, with a relay at the end.

Timer 1 triggers high instantly and has a capacitor and resistor wired to the reset it to zero. Roughly 7 seconds after powering up, the capacitor resets the timer and shuts the circuit off.

Timer 2 triggers low instantly and has a capacitor and resistor wired to the trigger pin. Roughly 5 seconds after powering up, the capacitor triggers the timer and turns the circuit on.

The two triggers are wired in series. When the car powers up, both timers activate. The output voltage immediately gets through Timer 1, but is blocked because Timer 2 is still off. Five seconds after startup, Timer 2 is triggered, allowing the output voltage to flow through both timers. Seven seconds after startup, Timer 1 resets and cuts its output power. This effectively means that power is only delivered for a two-second period 5-7 seconds after the car is started. During that two-second period, the pulse activates a small Omron relay shorting two wires in the harness feeding the button. This simulates a two-second button press.

This is actually not a great design, but it was a 15-minute, bourbon-inspired solution that I whipped up using components I already had in a spare parts drawer. It took longer for the Plasti-Dip to dry than it did to design it and assemble everything (I plasti-dipped the whole assembly to protect it from liquids and shorting since it's inside the console under the cupholders). I've already come up with an even better (and simpler) design that can be assembled for less than $10, but I'm still debating whether it's worth pulling the whole thing apart again to redo it. If I do replace it, I'll record the process and stick it up on Youtube. If not, I may post the circuit diagrams up so that others can give it a shot.


Does the Compass have position sensors on the seat for memory? A memory position circuit would be fairly easy to put together IF the seat has accessible sensor signals to read the current seat position. I didn't think that memory seats were an option on the Compass, so I'd be surprised if the sensors were there.
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post #42 of 59 Old 02-27-2019, 03:38 AM
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it was a 15-minute, bourbon-inspired solution
Those are sometimes the best solutions!

The reason I never did mine was because I always blow things up, and start building out a huge wish list, so I jump from "toggle a relay on and off once at engine startup" to "toggle a relay and implement seat memory positions and do cool stuff with USB and control dashcams, etc etc, that turns into "well might as well use an rPi and have a little server and centralized storage for the dash cams..."

And pretty soon I get nothing done but dreaming ...

I doubt there are any sensors ready to use on the seat. I was thinking if I had an arduino type of thing I could run the seat with relays paralleled to the switches, and I would also be tapped into the limit switches (whichI don't know if they exist, but they must right?) And then I would handle the settings via timing. Have the user put the seat into the desired position with manual controls, then when they indicate via a long button press that they are done run the seat all the way back/down and time out the time it takes to hit the limits. Then a short press on the same button recalls the setting by running the seat forward/up/etc the recorded amount of time. Two buttons for two settings that both work the same way.

Some drawbacks would be having the seat go to full back/down before resetting to the desired position, kinda awkward but we could probably live with it. It also might not be super accurate, it could take longer to raise the seat the same distance due to motors working with or against gravity, etc. Would probably want to not be on the seat when its trying to set it to help with that.

If I could get some encoders on the seat motors could avoid the full reset and be more precise. Could get lucky and find that they are perhaps stepper motors rather than plain DC in which case might be able to tap on and note the steps. I have no idea what hardware they used in these seats.

There ARE settings in AlfaOBD in the body computer for "Driver Seat Track Position" and passenger seat same thing, but they may depend on hardware not present so, sometime to investigate down the road.
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post #43 of 59 Old 02-27-2019, 08:37 PM
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Those are sometimes the best solutions!
Lol. It's functional. "Best" is probably pushing it. The bourbon, on the other hand, was quite good

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The reason I never did mine was because I always blow things up, and start building out a huge wish list, so I jump from "toggle a relay on and off once at engine startup" to "toggle a relay and implement seat memory positions and do cool stuff with USB and control dashcams, etc etc, that turns into "well might as well use an rPi and have a little server and centralized storage for the dash cams..." And pretty soon I get nothing done but dreaming ...
Perfect is the enemy of good. As engineers, it's easy to look at a collection of problems and want to design a single solution to solve them all. It's hard to design a solution that will actually do it. I've found that the best solution is to tackle the problems one at a time. If you can build on it to combine two solutions later, that's great, but KISS always works best.

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I was thinking if I had an arduino type of thing I could run the seat with relays paralleled to the switches, and I would also be tapped into the limit switches (whichI don't know if they exist, but they must right?)
Maybe, maybe not. A lot of motor systems use load to determine when the limit has been reached. When the motor reaches its range limit, the current load increases. Detecting this increase can allow the circuit to find its range limits without the need for a physical switch. I have no idea which system Alfa used.

OTOH, it may not matter. When the seat finds its limit, the controller cuts power to the motor to prevent it from burning out. The power cutout itself could be sensed and used to determine when the range limit has been reached, even if the car lacks a directly accessible limit switch. The power cut itself is all the indication that you would need.

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If I could get some encoders on the seat motors could avoid the full reset and be more precise
I haven't looked at it, but I'd presume that the motor uses some sort of worm drive to physically move the seat. A Hall effect sensor and a tiny magnet on the worm drive shaft would allow you to easily track the seats position after an initial calibration. For more resolution, you could also use a fixed magnet and Hall sensor, and attach a perforated metal disk to the worm drive between them. This would cause the sensor to "pulse" as the shaft rotated. Calculating seat position would simply be a matter of counting the pulses, and after that initial calibration it would remove the need for a "reset" entirely. Thinking about it a bit more, you could also accomplish the same thing with an IR emitter, an IR sensor, and some simple paint marks on the shaft. Detecting the shift in reflectivity would provide the same function as the magnets without requiring any permanent modifications to the worm drive itself (which may be good, if the shaft isn't in an easily accessible location or doesn't have enough clearance to allow a magnet or a disk to be attached).

Heck, if you wanted, you could connect that up to an rPI 0W and control your seat with your phone after that was put into place
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post #44 of 59 Old 02-28-2019, 01:42 AM
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There is not the slightest chance for this system to save me so much as a fraction of a penny There is no way shutting down for one second and then firing right back up instantly is saving me any gas, and thats pretty much the only thing it does if I forget to shut the system off when I get in and go.



Got used to the silence, eh? Must have also got used to the obnoxious CHUTHUTHUTHUTHTUHTUHT of restart and the glares of other drivers around you who have to hear your starter crank loudly and watch your headlights and taillights pulsing with the turning of the motor...

I know what part you really like, you enjoy the time when the motor is off at a stop because if its ON at a stop you have to listen to all your quarters in the cup holder chattering around, continuously shaken by the worlds most roughest idling four cylinder =P

The IDEA of ESS is fine. This particular implementation is not. It is garbage. I hope someday you get to ride in a car that does it right, you will see the difference.

The engine in mine is not rough, is quiet, the starter can only be heard if the window is down. Careful about ASSuming what I have and haven't driven. I've test driven a first gen Honda Insight, owned a first gen Toyota Prius, Ford Escape Hybrid, and a Chevrolet Volt. Like it or not, these systems are going to become ubiquitous in ICE powered cars, both hybrid and not. Cars do change and evolve as tech goes. I don't know how old you are, but there are still plenty of cars still on the road with carburetors, manual chokes, manual transmissions, manual windows, etc. 2 and 3 speed automatics have long given way to multi-speed transmissions - of which in our vehicles, don't use 2 of the 9 gears in normal everyday driving. CVT's are a common replacement to step gear automatics. Driving styles have long changed as cars have evolved. ESS systems are no different. It's just in this "I'm in a permanent hurry" day and age, people seem to be particularly bent when they have to either adapt to thinking and looking beyond their windshield wipers, or wait that 1 second for the ESS system to do it's thing since they didn't pay attention to what's going on around them. I'd love to see you work around the 1959 Mercedes 190D I owned back in the early 2000's. Diesels back then were not only low powered, but had little torque. The four speed on the tree manual would not be rushed through shifts, yet you had to shift - OFTEN - keep momentum up to keep up with traffic. Oh, and to start it. One had to pull on the aptly referred to "gorilla knob" A pull start mechanism that combined the glow plug circuit with the starter, and had a return spring that required the strength of a gorilla to hold partially out while you waited for a coil behind a cap called the salt shaker to glow red. Once it started to glow, it was a 30 second countdown to preheat the combustion pre-chambers sufficiently for it to start. After this, you had to pull even HARDER against that knob with your now tired arm to crank the starter. Congratulations, you now had a car with a 30 plus second 0 - 60 time running. Have fun keeping up in traffic.
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post #45 of 59 Old 02-28-2019, 10:57 PM
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The engine in mine is not rough, is quiet, the starter can only be heard if the window is down. Careful about ASSuming what I have and haven't driven. I've test driven a first gen Honda Insight, owned a first gen Toyota Prius, Ford Escape Hybrid, and a Chevrolet Volt. Like it or not, these systems are going to become ubiquitous in ICE powered cars, both hybrid and not. Cars do change and evolve as tech goes. I don't know how old you are, but there are still plenty of cars still on the road with carburetors, manual chokes, manual transmissions, manual windows, etc. 2 and 3 speed automatics have long given way to multi-speed transmissions - of which in our vehicles, don't use 2 of the 9 gears in normal everyday driving. CVT's are a common replacement to step gear automatics. Driving styles have long changed as cars have evolved. ESS systems are no different. It's just in this "I'm in a permanent hurry" day and age, people seem to be particularly bent when they have to either adapt to thinking and looking beyond their windshield wipers, or wait that 1 second for the ESS system to do it's thing since they didn't pay attention to what's going on around them. I'd love to see you work around the 1959 Mercedes 190D I owned back in the early 2000's. Diesels back then were not only low powered, but had little torque. The four speed on the tree manual would not be rushed through shifts, yet you had to shift - OFTEN - keep momentum up to keep up with traffic. Oh, and to start it. One had to pull on the aptly referred to "gorilla knob" A pull start mechanism that combined the glow plug circuit with the starter, and had a return spring that required the strength of a gorilla to hold partially out while you waited for a coil behind a cap called the salt shaker to glow red. Once it started to glow, it was a 30 second countdown to preheat the combustion pre-chambers sufficiently for it to start. After this, you had to pull even HARDER against that knob with your now tired arm to crank the starter. Congratulations, you now had a car with a 30 plus second 0 - 60 time running. Have fun keeping up in traffic.
I also have a quite starter that dont rock the car during starting. I hardly hear it unless I pay attention to it. People who have excessive rocking during startup might have an issue with engine mounts, I think I read somewhere that either on 2.4 Renegade or Cherokee, these parts were prone to malfunction or were installed improperly installed, which caused a lot of squeaking noise and engine rocking during startup.
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post #46 of 59 Old 03-11-2019, 06:23 AM
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John Cadogan has a new video out with a pretty solid, if not long-winded, collection of studies and evidence that suggest stop-start is a complete and utter farce. Worth a watch.

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post #47 of 59 Old 10-17-2019, 08:29 PM
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Start/Stop mode is turned off by default

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... I've already come up with an even better (and simpler) design that can be assembled for less than $10, but I'm still debating whether it's worth pulling the whole thing apart again to redo it. If I do replace it, I'll record the process and stick it up on Youtube. If not, I may post the circuit diagrams up so that others can give it a shot.
Hi!
I plan to implement such idea in my car. Would you give more information about your new revision (better and simpler design).
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post #48 of 59 Old 10-17-2019, 10:41 PM
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... I've already come up with an even better (and simpler) design that can be assembled for less than $10, but I'm still debating whether it's worth pulling the whole thing apart again to redo it. If I do replace it, I'll record the process and stick it up on Youtube. If not, I may post the circuit diagrams up so that others can give it a shot.

Hi!
I plan to implement such idea in my car. Would you give more information about your new revision (better and simpler design).
Just get ALFAOBD then turn it off with software.
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Most likely the battery. If I were you I will disable that system completely.
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post #50 of 59 Old 10-20-2019, 11:46 PM
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Haven't seen much on the start/stop for awhile. Was curious if anyone knew if the original battery, (Group 47) and the aux battery, were replaced with a larger battery, ( group 48 ) which has more cranking amps, cold cranking amps, and reserve, and having all connections for both batteries on the one battery, if everything would work ok and hopefully override the stupid ESS setup, I disable it always and if I had been told about it and the no gas cap feature without a locking door, I'd have bought another vehicle. Also figure the switch is a normally open switch you push to disable the ESS, if the switch could be jumpered to stay closed. Just wanting opinions. I looked at wiring and it looks like the 2 batteries are in parallel so there might be another connection that would need to be made if the small aux battery was eliminated. Thanks

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post #51 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 04:20 AM
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....Also figure the switch is a normally open switch you push to disable the ESS, if the switch could be jumpered to stay closed.
I thought the same thing and tried holding the button in once in the off mode and restarting the truck...did not work. So likely just jumpering the switch connection may not do it.

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post #52 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 03:32 PM
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Again I would just disable the feature via Alfaobd. No wires no fuss. Just disables the feature on the body computer.
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post #53 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 05:53 PM
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Again I would just disable the feature via Alfaobd. No wires no fuss. Just disables the feature on the body computer.
Checked the pricing for the AlfaOBD software and the recommended OBD interface. AlfaOBD Windows software is $55 USD ($49 Euros) and a OBDLinkmx is $80.00. There is also a cheaper OBD interface called Vgate that is $30 USD. So it looks like $85 to $135 range for a setup.

My only concern is somehow screwing up and voiding my warranty. I wish I could have someone with the system just plug it all in and do it for me. Wonder if a dealer would do it? Likely more than the above costs if they would even do it.

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Sport Appearance Group,
Technology Group,
Compact Spare Tire.
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post #54 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Baja-D View Post
Checked the pricing for the AlfaOBD software and the recommended OBD interface. AlfaOBD Windows software is $55 USD ($49 Euros) and a OBDLinkmx is $80.00. There is also a cheaper OBD interface called Vgate that is $30 USD. So it looks like $85 to $135 range for a setup.

My only concern is somehow screwing up and voiding my warranty. I wish I could have someone with the system just plug it all in and do it for me. Wonder if a dealer would do it? Likely more than the above costs if they would even do it.

Baja-D
Warranty is tricky, but unless you screw up a module or something in such a way that it needs to be replaced, they would not care. I assume they should be able to see if configuration was modified by a non-dealer scanner since the computer has a event log that records the changes made and serial of the scanner that made the change. A dealers were able to tell me which previous dealer made an update based on this log (I assume they can match serials to dealers), on my 2006 Jeep GC.

About dealer doing it, I highly doubt it. It would be modifying emission settings/properties of a car, which is illegal.
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post #55 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja-D View Post
Checked the pricing for the AlfaOBD software and the recommended OBD interface. AlfaOBD Windows software is $55 USD ($49 Euros) and a OBDLinkmx is $80.00. There is also a cheaper OBD interface called Vgate that is $30 USD. So it looks like $85 to $135 range for a setup.

My only concern is somehow screwing up and voiding my warranty. I wish I could have someone with the system just plug it all in and do it for me. Wonder if a dealer would do it? Likely more than the above costs if they would even do it.

Baja-D
You might also need an OBD adapter cable, and for your 2019 you will also need a Security Gateway Bypass Module.

From the AlfaOBD website:
Quote:
Note: Starting from MY2018 (Fiat 500L from MY2017) FCA installs the Security Gateway Module (SGW) which blocks access to diagnostics for the third-party software. There is no software solution yet, as a workaround please use a hardware bypass module...

...Owners of Alfa Romeo Giulia/Stelvio, Fiat 500X/Toro/Jeep Renegade/Compass (MP) : make sure that the bypass supports the second high-speed CAN bus, the one that is connected to the pins 12 and 13 of the car OBD port...

...Note: Alfa Romeo Giulia/Stelvio, Fiat 500X/Toro and Jeep Renegade/Compass (MP) require the "grey" adapter for the access to the second high-speed CAN bus...
I will be waiting until my warranty expires before trying AlfaOBD.

2019 Jeep Compass Latitude
2.4L, 9 Speed Automatic Transmission
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post #56 of 59 Old 10-21-2019, 09:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgef View Post
You might also need an OBD adapter cable, and for your 2019 you will also need a Security Gateway Bypass Module. I will be waiting until my warranty expires before trying AlfaOBD.
OK...at this point I think I will wait also. Maybe try the hood switch mod (disable) and see what happens.

Baja-D

2019 Jeep Compass Sport FWD,
2.4L I4 M-Air Engine,
6 Speed Automatic Transmission,
Sport Appearance Group,
Technology Group,
Compact Spare Tire.

Last edited by Baja-D; 10-22-2019 at 09:39 AM.
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post #57 of 59 Old 10-22-2019, 05:25 PM
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You can get the trial version alfaobd and get an obdmx+ and test if it will connect.

If it will connect without issse and see all the on board info though the app then you don't need a security bypass module. This is all in the alfaobd thread.

I am still within my factory warranty and my Chrysler buyback extra warranty and I also bought lifetime warranty through Mopar. (With a $250 deductible)

Warranties are tricky but mostly it has to do if you break it then you are going to have to pay for it. Since the property is yours you are able to do what you wish with it. they have to trackle correlate whatever modification you do to the problem that the warranty is trying to cover. They might be able to see that the computer was accessed, but unless I had anything to do with the reason why you are coming to the dealership for the fix and claim on the warranty then they don't have a leg to stand on.

That is why you're able to mod your car and it does not void the warranty. It directly has to cause the brake that is in question. Places might scare tactic you or you might not want to deal with it but that is how it works.

It is your car, and it is software disable it is safer then doing what ever DIY things you guys are listing above.

"Wannabe Blacked Out - Oscar" - 2017 Jeep Compass 2nd gen body "Latitude 4x4"
"The Black Castle - Cassie" - 2014 Chevy Tahoe LTZ 4x4 (Wife's Castle) Slight mods with lighting and head and tail lights
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post #58 of 59 Old Today, 01:28 PM
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Hey guys, I'm reading this thread because I've had my Compass in the shop 4 times due to start / stop issues.
Honestly I'm ready to give up on this thing because every time they "replace it" I'm good for a couple of months and then boom, it happens again.
I dropped it off this morning so we'll see what happens but my advise is if you're considering one of these vehicles / Run the other direction!
Dedicated Jeep owner here but I don't believe they're good vehicles... I also have a 2016 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited and a 2004 Grand Cherokee Limited - No issues.
The new Compass design looks great but I think ultimately they will probably end up dropping them because they're a turd.

Adding pics of mine below:
Attached Images
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post #59 of 59 Old Today, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dj70sscamino
were replaced with a larger battery, ( group 48 ) which has more cranking amps, cold cranking amps, and reserve, and having all connections for both batteries on the one battery, if everything would work ok
I don't know for certain but it would probably be super unhappy about it. You definitely can't bridge those connections together like that onto one battery, you will make the IBS go bizerk and probably fry it at worst, or set off a mountain of codes at best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dj70sscamino
Also figure the switch is a normally open switch you push to disable the ESS, if the switch could be jumpered to stay closed.
Nope. It will throw an error if the switch is permanently closed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dj70sscamino
I looked at wiring and it looks like the 2 batteries are in parallel
Not really, its more complicated than that. The aux battery has its own management module (the IBS) and is used to power specific circuits during ESS events. I don't think the system ever directly connects them in parallel outside of a managed charge scheme. Not sure though.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja-D
My only concern is somehow screwing up and voiding my warranty. I wish I could have someone with the system just plug it all in and do it for me.
I have had warranty work done (Uconnect replaced) with alfaOBD mods in place (ESS disabled, seatbelt warning disabled, etc) and my dealership did not bat an eye or say anything about it. Got my car back with the new radio in and all my software mods still intact.



Quote:
Dedicated Jeep owner here but I don't believe they're good vehicles...
Yeah its a real bummer, it feels like all the headache of owning a BMW or an Audi or something fancy like that, where you buy it just because you want the image/brand but its not actually a solid reliable car, you have to be willing to put up with the maintenance and dumb issues. The Compass is a particularly bad example though, its unbelievable to me that they built and sold me something where occasionally you get in and the HVAC has switched itself to full LO and its 10 degrees outside, or how if you set the volume to zero and turn it off when you start it up again it will ear-rape you at volume 20. Stupid stupid stupid mistakes that they don't even seem to care to correct. It just feels like they don't care about this car at all. None of the other FCA vehicles with the same or similar 8.4 Uconnect have these issues. So now I'm trained like a monkey to only turn my volume down to level 1 (never zero), and sometimes I use remote start to defrost and hop in and find the AC running full blast on LO... whatever. First world problems. But if thats how its gonna be I'm just going for the beamer or a land rover next time around, so it won't be so surprising.
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