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Grinding sounds in the rear left the side of the vehicle while breaking, some braking sounds worse than others! Btw my Mother has been driving since this issue & was told when she got her tires replaced a couple months ago that her rear breaks would need to be replaced pretty soon.
 

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Grinding sounds in the rear left the side of the vehicle while breaking, some braking sounds worse than others! Btw my Mother has been driving since this issue & was told when she got her tires replaced a couple months ago that her rear breaks would need to be replaced pretty soon.
Well, you've got a professional opinion from someone who has actually looked at it -- they're probably right. They didn't pressure you into doing the work right then and there so at first glance they seem honest. They were giving you a "heads up" and my impression is that they can be trusted.

Brakes aren't terribly expensive and are a normal wear & tear item on any vehicle. If you get to it soon it may only need pads; if its been driven for a while with worn pads they may have started to wear down the rotors or brake linings. That may be the grinding sound you hear, so the needed work may be more than just pads.

Truthfully the rotors on Patriots are rather thin and often they can't be "turned" (ground down till smooth again) so don't be surprised if your mechanic says they must be replaced. If a vehicle isn't used a lot, spends its overnights in damp conditions like parked on dirt or grass, or near the ocean, a river or lake, then its rotors may rust prematurely.

Patriots are relatively light vehicles so the brakes may last a good long time, but sooner or later anything wears out. I got nearly 100,000 miles out of my brakes, but my rear brakes that wore out first. Again, that may be what you are hearing.
 

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Replace the rear Rotors and Pads, I found on my Compass the right hand rear brake caliper was actually sticking on its sliders!

So what it does is wear down the pad on the inside, but not the outside, the Rotor looks not great, but its because the inside is doing all the work, so you get down to the metal pretty quickly.

I unseized mine and used copper grease on the sliders and now its working great again!

I'd say its certainly worth getting a mechanic to have a look, replace the rotors and pads, adjust the handbrake and service all the moving parts, not all mechanics do it when they replace the parts either, but my dads always taught me to service everything while your there if it needs it so it lasts and you dont do the job twice.
 

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Brake friction material

Just thought I would throw this out there. As a professional technician I have performed many brake jobs. I always suggest using the best friction material you can afford. The parts stores don't always have qualified personnel (gee what a surprise!!) that understand what they are selling the public. Most people today look at PRICE. Very few people give any thought about stopping distance or performance. Cheap pad manufactuers tout the fact that their friction materials meet OE specs. What they don't tell you is the friction may meet only 1 spec and not all of the OE specs. Their material will actually cause the vehicle to have LONGER stopping distances. I have seen studies stating that the vehicle may take up to 30 feet longer to stop versus the original specification! Better friction (especially aftermarket) material has better stopping ability versus the cheap stuff. Putting cheap friction material on your vehicle can put you in danger. I personally use POWERSTOP friction (available online or thru your local parts store). A phone call to their tech line will give you an education second to none. Marty
 
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