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Hi there everyone!

I just recently purchased a 2014 Compass Limited Off Road Package and I have a few questions regarding the use of 4X4.

This is my first SUV and all I have had previously was cars and a truck that was a straight up 4x4 hi/low. I'm super happy to have this compass now to help tackle these lovely Alberta winters.

So as far as I understand, this vehicle is a full time AWD system which requires no input. Now when I want to switch it to 4x4 Lock do I simply just lift up on the handle in the center console? I don't need to put it into off road mode to active 4x4, is this correct?

Also i'm just wondering when the off road gear would be used. I'm assuming I won't need to use it as I won't be doing too much off roading, but if there is very deep snow would this be useful?

Does anyone have any tips on using these systems for winter driving? Especially when it comes to 4x4 and ECS/Traction control?

Thanks in advance everyone and sorry for all the questions!
 

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Did you get to use the 4x4 yet? I noticed the difference using 4x4 in hilly/snowy conditions and believe the tires are one of the key differences in winter handling.
 

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Hi there everyone!

I just recently purchased a 2014 Compass Limited Off Road Package and I have a few questions regarding the use of 4X4.

This is my first SUV and all I have had previously was cars and a truck that was a straight up 4x4 hi/low. I'm super happy to have this compass now to help tackle these lovely Alberta winters.

So as far as I understand, this vehicle is a full time AWD system which requires no input. Now when I want to switch it to 4x4 Lock do I simply just lift up on the handle in the center console? I don't need to put it into off road mode to active 4x4, is this correct?

Also i'm just wondering when the off road gear would be used. I'm assuming I won't need to use it as I won't be doing too much off roading, but if there is very deep snow would this be useful?

Does anyone have any tips on using these systems for winter driving? Especially when it comes to 4x4 and ECS/Traction control?

Thanks in advance everyone and sorry for all the questions!
Well the 4x4 drive of the Compass is FWD primarily as per 99% of the vehicles built as AWD. That said, the Compass power train will transfer power to DRIVE the rear wheels when a SLIP is detected at the front (a slip is apparently a partial turn to activate it which may differ over the years). A you say you don't need to pull up the T-lever, however if you are on slippery roads and/or snow covered etc. You may want it on so that the rear are actually working to keep you pushing forward (you have drive at the front and from the rear when its ON).

So when to put it on.
- heavy rain
- snow covered
- slippery hilly terrain
- towing a heavy load and/or uphill

These situations I would recommend so that the work is transferred in part to the rear as well. NOTE if in real deep stuff and where tires need to or may spin to get going you need to turn the ESC OFF. Once back on normal driving where your traction is improved you can turn it back ON.
 

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Compass AWD system doesn't need to detect a slip in order to transfer power to the rear wheels. I"ve tested this out many times,

From the service manual:


OPERATION

The all-wheel-drive system requires no driver input or control. Under most driving conditions, it is passive and power is transmitted to the front wheels alone. Unlike all-wheel drive systems that rely on pumps or viscous fluids to transfer torque, this system requires no front-to-rear slippage for activation. This allows the system to transfer torque solely in response to accelerator pedal position. If the driver is asking for a lot of power, the system immediately starts clamping the electronically controlled coupling (ECC), transferring a high percentage of power to the rear wheels. This avoids front wheel slippage, as power to propel the car is transmitted through all four tires. This mode of operation is called open-loop operation in that there is no feedback to affect the torque transfer.

A second, closed loop, operating mode uses feedback from the wheel-speed sensors to determine the appropriate torque transfer. When the front wheels slip, the All Wheel Drive (AWD) Control Module tells the ECC to start clamping, sending power to the rear wheels. Attempting the same aggressive launch described above with the front wheels on ice and the rear wheels on dry pavement, the ECC sends even more torque to the rear wheels to minimize slippage and launch the vehicle. Both modes are always active with the closed loop mode layered on top of open loop mode to increase torque to the rear wheels when needed to maintain traction in extreme cases.
:eyebrows:
 
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