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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I drove to LA yesterday and had to drive back today. As I started the journey the temperature light came on for transmission oil. The owners manual said to just wait till it cools down. Is this going to keep happening or is it the cheap tranny oil the dealer put in?

Has anyone else had this problem? If you know how to fix it please let me know because I need this car to be a commutter
 

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I have an aftermarket tranny cooler so I've never had this problem. I would be concerned with breakdown of the oil after reaching that temperature.That would cause overheating, as would having a fairly dirty rad or low oil in the CVT. I have read that some of the stock tranny coolers for the CVT are defective so this is possible as well. The belt in the CVT could be slipping as well. I think I gave you enough to look at for now. Let us know what you find out.
 

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That doesn't sound good at all! I've always gone with the trans cooler option as well even though I'm not as tough on my vehicles as I used to be. I would be heading back to the dealer on this one as it seems in the case of the CVT, they're really particular about it being serviced by a qualified tech with the right tools. Good luck and let us know how you make out.

- Cherokee
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I took it in yesterday and all they told me was nothing was wrong with the transmission cooler. Also same with the coolant system. On the paper work it did say the transmission fluid looked burnt or degraded so I will get that changed out on Friday. I haven't seen the light come on yet. I drive up to LA this weekend so I will keep you updated.
 

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I have an aftermarket tranny cooler so I've never had this problem. I would be concerned with breakdown of the oil after reaching that temperature.That would cause overheating, as would having a fairly dirty rad or low oil in the CVT. I have read that some of the stock tranny coolers for the CVT are defective so this is possible as well. The belt in the CVT could be slipping as well. I think I gave you enough to look at for now. Let us know what you find out.
What aftermarket cooler? I have seen the option kit for the CVT and it connect to the cooling hoses, oil filter adapter etc. Looks complex not just in and out of the tranny fluid.
 

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Well, I took it in yesterday and all they told me was nothing was wrong with the transmission cooler. Also same with the coolant system. On the paper work it did say the transmission fluid looked burnt or degraded so I will get that changed out on Friday. I haven't seen the light come on yet. I drive up to LA this weekend so I will keep you updated.
Check with another dealer if you can. I find that only some techs really know whats going on. Unless they see the light is on or a code is thrown they don't believe you if its still working or they have no clue how to trouble shoot the problem they cannot see starring at them. They seem to relie on calling in to Chrysler for guidance and if you under warranty get the problem entered clearly that its overheating with the light coming on numerous times or what ever wording indicates your situation. You can use that work order after warranty has passed since they did not fix it when it was covered.

No wonder I never bought new in over 10 years still running to the dealer to fix problems they take forever to identify.
 

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Sorry not aftermarket I put the mopar kit on mine since the hoses don't have taps for the transmission on them. Looking at the CVT setup it wouldn't be hard to install a standard finned cooler. It would only take a bit of hose since the CVT is already tapped into the cooling system. Just remove the tap off on the bottom rad hose to the CVT and re-route it to the cooler then run a line to connect the cooler back to the CVT. Voilà, a simple transmission cooler.
 

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Well, I took it in yesterday and all they told me was nothing was wrong with the transmission cooler. Also same with the coolant system. On the paper work it did say the transmission fluid looked burnt or degraded so I will get that changed out on Friday. I haven't seen the light come on yet. I drive up to LA this weekend so I will keep you updated.
Aaah yes, they're waiting for you to come back. Why on Earth would they make a note of the trans fluid looking burnt or degraded and NOT make the recommendation to get it changed? I would be looking for another dealership there myself.

- Cherokee
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update: on that drive up to LA I drove her a lot gentler but the last leg of the trip it came on again. I'm going to pay to get the fluid and filter changed. I'll take it to a dealership up in LA do you think I will be safe to wait a month or two because unfortunately in San Diego I only have one dealership?
 

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Depends on how much you drive it etc, and the condition its in. If you've already had it checked (entered on their work order) with their responds. Keep the work order as proof in case they try and come back at you for not bring it to an authorized service centers attention. But insist with LA service center there is something wrong. Changing the fluid will only bring the fluid quality back but not correct the cause of the overheating.

I would suggest calling one or more LA dealer and explain the symptoms and fluid state. See what they say about a solution. mention you are out of town and need this rectified on the first visit. If need be even call Chysler customer service for guidance and if they recommend a dealer in the LA area who know the transmission. Those phone calls would save a lot of grief down the line. Something is wrong if the fluid is overheating and any mechanic worth his grease and skinned knuckles with know that. If its a tranny problem and still under the powertrain warranty. They will cover the fluid as part of the repair or replacement of the CVT unit. Focus on fixing the problem.


Goodluck
 

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I agree with tripplec. A few phone calls will hopefully make things easier, but they should cover the cost of the fluid/filter replacement but they really need to be looking into what's causing this problem. Good luck and be sure to keep us posted!

- Cherokee
 

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I am having the same problem with my 2008 Jeep Compass. First time I stopped at a dealer place on a trip as no one else would touch it. Dealer said to let it cool and if no problems to drive it. Tonight my "trans oil temp" warning light came on again (after several weeks) and after I had driven up a mountain. I am no mechanical anything but it sounds like it works too hard going up even the slightest hill....does fine otherwise. I would be interested to hear anything else about what happened with your jeep on this issue.
 

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Whether is the fluid pump or the CVT Rad which is located along the bottom behind the radiator. It its all plugged up with grit or even mud it would account for that. It runs the width of the rad but from an image not likely more than 6" high.
 

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Hmmm... My transmission has already been replaced once. A guy from AAMCO told me today that he's seeing CVT transmissions about once a week for replacement! My temp light went on yesterday and he says I need a transmission cooler. I have a 2013 Jeep Compass Latitude. Transmission was replaced at 76,000 miles and it is acting up regularly now (111,000 miles) tho this is the first time the temp light has gone on. Shouldn't the dealer have put in the (aftermarket) cooler when they replaced the transmission? Am I stupid to pay $300 for a trans cooler now? Pretty mad about this car. Suspension problems, too...
 

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The OEM cooler is at the bottom and behind the Rad. It should be quite adequate for cooling it for all situations. A tow option include a cooler but its for the engine oil, not the tranny.

There are some related serviceable parts for the CVT. You should take it to a Compass specific dealer or true CVT transmission shop. If any exist since its a totally different beast.

You're wasting you money on the cooler and likely create other problems. Especially if the wrong fluid is used. Jeep is very specific on the fluid to use. Nothing else!!!
 

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Jeep Compass 2007 transmission oil overheat

I had the same problem ,but I bought in salvage yard (pick a part at el paso) an a/c condenser near same size of the original condenser of my jeep was installed over the condenser and bypassed the trans hoses with clamps and still working excellent more than 320 miles without problems, after It was installed 3 qtr of oil were added and was replaced with pep's boys valvoline cvt oil $8.99 qtr and worked very good .
some pic's available
 

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Jeep Compass 2007 transmission oil overheat

I had the same problem ,but I bought in salvage yard (pick a part at el paso) an a/c condenser near same size of the original condenser of my jeep was installed over the condenser and bypassed the trans hoses with clamps and still working excellent more than 320 miles without problems, after It was installed 3 qtr of oil were added and was replaced with pep's boys valvoline cvt oil $8.99 qtr and worked very good .
some pic's available
Ive had this argument with many dealer techs and service managers already, Ive been cursed by Dealer tech support.

Its a hot running transmission and it was from the day it was new! Your solution ius excellent. I prefer a bracket installed air gapped arrangement, but absolutely, a 2nd cooler on the jeep CVT has solved this problem on MANY MANY peoples compass and pats with this issue. It never cooled well enough. NEVER. Typical 3000 rpm freeway temp new was 235 degrees after 15 minutes! thats too hot! at 263 it sets a fault and lights the light,.

Normal temp for most transmissions is engine temp or lower slightly when cruising, and higher only if towing or going up long hills...and only 10 or 20 degrees even under those conditions.

COOL COOL COOL! thats what it takes. All the associated fluid checks, pure synthetic is preferred, full and never overfull. fresh filter, and then clean factory cooler and augment with the largest additional cooler you can fit. Its the only solution weve found that worked.
 

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When it overheats you'll usually hear a screaming noise from the transmission. If you hear that you know you've overheated the CVT and the fluid is essentially ruined.

Obviously you've got to solve the overheating problem but for those who don't know, it is essential to change the CVT fluid at least every 50,000 miles -- some say even more frequently.
 

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When it overheats you'll usually hear a screaming noise from the transmission. If you hear that you know you've overheated the CVT and the fluid is essentially ruined.

Obviously you've got to solve the overheating problem but for those who don't know, it is essential to change the CVT fluid at least every 50,000 miles -- some say even more frequently.
When it overheats you'll usually hear a screaming noise from the transmission. If you hear that you know you've overheated the CVT and the fluid is essentially ruined.

Obviously you've got to solve the overheating problem but for those who don't know, it is essential to change the CVT fluid at least every 50,000 miles -- some say even more frequently.
The modern full synthetics can take quite a lot of abuse if temp is kept under 300. The oil doesnt really break down much if its not already at end of life. If it has 75000 hard miles already and then you town a boat up the grapevine pass 20 miles uphill at 70mph, the oil will probably turn black. However the screaming noise isnt actually from the oil breaking down, its cavitation from boiling of the oil causing air bubbles that are being compressed by the pump and making noise as they bounce the pump with air/oil alternating pressures during its rotation. Its bad because it signals the oil is boiling...which is hard to do unless its really hot (The whining/buzzing typically start at 240+, gets loudest at around 255-275 or 280 then the volume stops increasing).

I personally dont like anything CVT. Do I particularly hate the Nissan Jatco/Jeep CVT tranny? I dont think its a great unit even among other CVTs. I think it has some inherant design flaws (like its tendency to run hot above 2500 rpm, and the manufacturers tendency to not fix that problem and instead deny it till it breaks). But I can say the exact same statement about pretty much any CVT on the planet from any company. NONE OF THEM is good at dealing with heat, none of them are well supported by the factory or the aftermarket. Take your pick, Ford, Chevy, Honda, Toyota...doesnt really matter. They dont want them fixed or maintained. They want them to drive till they break(The magic numbers are 40k, and 100k), and then get replaced, or the whole car replaced. Hence the grotesque lack of internal component availability (Some valves and solenoids that should cost say 100 dollars each and the unit has 10 or 11, they require you to buy the entire valve body assembly and the module with it with all 11 installed...for say 2500 dollars shop cost, customer billed at 3300ish, to get 1 100 dollar solenoid! Rather than say change a single defective solenoid so the trans can go back into service for another 20 or 30k at least for under 500 to repair. Instead its 5000. Thats modern factory CVT logic). Think of the modern electronic sticks. For those not aware, many modern "autos" arent really autos, they are stick shifts with clutches that are depressed and shifts done by the ECM using switches and servos and solenoids to replace the pedal and stick. I dont like those either. Too clunky, tend to be EXTREMELY labor intensive to repair (they like to cram all that electronic shift junk into the same cases and trannys they had before so its really a mess spacewise)

By all means, I tell people do what you can with what you got. ALL manufacturers are using CVT or electroshift stick now. ALL. On paper, it saves gas and thusly makes less emissions. Because of that, it is the only future for combustion transmissions until electrics and fuel cells push them out in 10 or 15 more years. Its slightly depressing as a technician. I can name at least 10 or even 20 transmissions from the past 50 years from most of the worlds manufacturers that were capable and even likely to go 200k with little or no breakage if they got only occasional maintenance and werent abused.
NOW? I cant think of many Id expect to consistently make it to 150 unless extremely well maintained or primary low load operation (Fluid services BEFORE factory intervals, and no warm weather loaded operation ever).

Adding an external cooler is a modification that works. On a 1975 to 2000 vehicle, it could be argued it was a waste of time unless it was a tow vehicle. Those pre-computer trannys had massive drums and clutch plates, bigger bearings, took 12 quarts of durable fluid and they ran much cooler than the modern stuff. On a modern CVT? It helps. It makes a 30 degree difference that can be measured with a temp check or a graph on a scantool. 250 degrees after 20 minutes, dropped to 211 stable. Still not the icy 175f of a 1990 ford or chevy at 20 minutes, but its not boiling and eating itself at 211.it can keep on rolling.
 
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