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hey guys im looking for a winter setup for my 2014 latitude currently has 225/65/17, no rubbing at all atm. im looking to get some pro comp series 32 16x8 with a 4.5back spacing and 0 offset. we see a fair amount of snow here in Chicago i like the all terrain look for tires i was thinking of getting some 225/65/16 or 225/70/16 and i'm not sure if i can get 235 with either 70-65. im also open to suggestion for tires. id want to fit something that wont require a lift of pinch weld mod. also if i would end up rubbing would spacers have an affect on how it drives?. thanks in advance guys!


this guys has them on his patriot i like how they look( he has 225/70/16 no rubbing, no spacers) the tires he has are bf goodrich duratrac A/T.
 

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Tires in the pic look like BF goodrich KOs or KO2s. Duratracs would be a Goodyear tire. KO2's are considered to be good in snow, I haven't driven them personally just going by reviews and tests.
Zero offset rims means the rims sit further out from the vehicle. You should not need spacers with zero offset rims. With zero offset your tires certainly won't rub on the suspension, but could rub on the pinch weld area at the back of the front wheel wells when turning. The wheels would be further out from the vehicle so they will move through a larger arc when turning, which can bring the edge of the tire into contact with the pinch weld. 225/70/16 is a good choice to avoid that issue.
Another way to avoid contacting the pinch weld area while turning is to select a wheel with some positive offset. Positive offset means closer to the vehicle, so smaller turning arc and the tire edge stays further from the pinch weld. Just an example but : http://www.kmcwheels.com/wheelSpecs/4378/1902/13670/xd818-heist 16x8 with a +10 offset.
As for effect on how it drives, it doesn't really matter if you use spacers to push the wheels out from the vehicle or if you use zero or low positive offset wheels, either way the tires end up farther from the vehicle. That has some subtle effects. It decreases the effective spring rate, adds some moment of force on the wheel bearings and suspension bushings, and increases the wheel track. So you could expect a slightly softer ride, wheel bearings and suspension bushings to fail sooner, and the vehicle to be slightly less likely to tip over ;-) My personal impression / observation is that these effects are minor and I enjoy driving the vehicle more compared to stock wheels and tires.
 
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