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Complete BS in bold :pat:
I think they should have said something like between 5-15 mins after the engine is shut off. But the warmed up engine part is correct. If you measure the oil level of cold engine, it will be ~half qt lower than what is read for warmed engine (especially if ambient temperature is also cold). 0w-20 oil has significant thermal expansion.
 

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I disagree and I check all oil cold regardless of what FCA says, when you change your oil and add oil to the crankcase and oil filter (5.5qts) and it reads on the dipstick where ever it is ( slighlty above the half way point on the cross hatch on my dipstick ). Thats where the oil needs to be every time I check it cold. 5 min after the engine is off is a joke, I'd wait at least all of 15 for the oil to get back in the pan. To each there own

I think they should have said something like between 5-15 mins after the engine is shut off. But the warmed up engine part is correct. If you measure the oil level of cold engine, it will be ~half qt lower than what is read for warmed engine (especially if ambient temperature is also cold). 0w-20 oil has significant thermal expansion.
 

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I disagree and I check all oil cold regardless of what FCA says, when you change your oil and add oil to the crankcase and oil filter (5.5qts) and it reads on the dipstick where ever it is ( slighlty above the half way point on the cross hatch on my dipstick ). Thats where the oil needs to be every time I check it cold. 5 min after the engine is off is a joke, I'd wait at least all of 15 for the oil to get back in the pan. To each there own
And if you read the oil level of the warm engine after an oil change, it reads at the very top of the crosshatch, so I think the crosshatch is designed for warmed up engine. If you were to add another half qt of oil to a cold engine to fill to the top of the crosshatch, it would be overfilled when the engine is warm. I think they added that "warm engine" part so that people do not accidentally overfill the engine oil based on half qt lower reading of the cold engine. In the end, it doesnt matter as long as you know where 5.5qts of oil correspond to on the crosshatch for cold and warm engine. And I agree with 5 mins being too short, I generally wait 10-15mins.

The reason why I check for warmed up engine is because my readings change based on the ambient temperature. This winter we had few cases of wildly swinging temperatures (32F one night and -15F next night), based on the overnight low, my cold morning reading was slightly different, but they were the same for warmed engine. If daily swings are low, it would probably not matter.
 

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Mine blew the engine at 10,700 miles. They replaced the engine (took almost a month) and then they had to replace the tensioner and serpentine belt. Went through arbitration and was told that FCA replace the engine out of the goodness of their hearts. Also, the arbitrator used to work for Chrysler. I will never buy another FCA product. I thought Jeep (and I know it is a Fiat 500) was supposed to have high quality. I wish I would have kept my Ford Fusion.
 

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Motor burning oil

Daughter bought 2018 compass has 1800 miles on it low oil pressure light came on she took it to dealer they told her no oil on the dip stick.Was told the compass burns oil they have no reason why.What really made me furious was they charged her $78 to change the oil.number 1 brand new vehicle shouldn’t burn oil and shouldn’t have to change after 1800 miles.The service rep told her since it burns oil to keep an eye on it and add oil when needed.She talked to someone else they told her bring it back in 1000 miles if the vehicle is still burning oil may have to replace motor.Just sad that she has to go through this she has worked hard to save for this vehicle it is her first new one and this is what you get.
 

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I've mentioned this on another thread. My Compass is using a lot less oil now that I'm up to 30,000 miles. Since my last oil change (25,000 miles I've added a quart and I'm down just a tad on the dipstick. I estimate I'm getting about 3,000/qt. When I'm down to needed another quart I'll just get the oil changed anyway, so really I'm using about a quart between oil changes.

Agreed, no engine should use this much, and my sympathy to those who's engines are using far more than mine, but it seems that this engine improves with age. Not quite like a fine wine does, but its better than it was.
 

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I just heard about this oil consumption issue and I started worrying. My wife and I both own a 2018 Compass. We love the car. The reason I worry is because I do everything when it comes to the cars- she just drives. My wife is in outside sales and puts a lot of miles on her car and I do check the oil on my car without thinking, but it is a different story with my wife's car. Anyway, I did an oil change at 5,000 on my car and my wife's car at 7,000. Oil level a little low on my wife's car- 1/2 a quart. I used penzoill ultra platinum and mopar filters from Walmart. Penzoil was 23.00 for five quarts. Now, I can only find 0-20 penzoil ultra for 45.00 online. Walmart has 0-20 valvoline full synthetic for 23.00 that meets FCA spec MS-????, and I was thinking I would use that oil but do not want this oil consumption issue to start. I read the the Compass is factory filled with penzoil. I just checked my oil and it still looks clean after putting 4,000 miles after the last change. Anyway, will valvoline pass the test and Basically get two oil changes for the price of one?
 

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I just heard about this oil consumption issue and I started worrying. My wife and I both own a 2018 Compass. We love the car. The reason I worry is because I do everything when it comes to the cars- she just drives. My wife is in outside sales and puts a lot of miles on her car and I do check the oil on my car without thinking, but it is a different story with my wife's car. Anyway, I did an oil change at 5,000 on my car and my wife's car at 7,000. Oil level a little low on my wife's car- 1/2 a quart. I used penzoill ultra platinum and mopar filters from Walmart. Penzoil was 23.00 for five quarts. Now, I can only find 0-20 penzoil ultra for 45.00 online. Walmart has 0-20 valvoline full synthetic for 23.00 that meets FCA spec MS-????, and I was thinking I would use that oil but do not want this oil consumption issue to start. I read the the Compass is factory filled with penzoil. I just checked my oil and it still looks clean after putting 4,000 miles after the last change. Anyway, will valvoline pass the test and Basically get two oil changes for the price of one?
Mopar uses penzoil platinum 0w-20, not ultra platinum. If you do a oil change at the dealer and cross reference their product code, it turns out to be penzoil platinum 0w-20. I think any major car parts store sells penzoil platinum 0w-20. You can use that.
 

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I use any 0-20. Right now its Mobil 1. AYK any 0-20 is synthetic or maybe a blend. I don't think they can get conventional oil that thin, but I'm not a chemical engineer.
 

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I just heard about this oil consumption issue and I started worrying. Anyway, I did an oil change at 5,000 on my car and my wife's car at 7,000. Oil level a little low on my wife's car- 1/2 a quart. Walmart has 0-20 valvoline full synthetic for 23.00 that meets FCA spec MS-????, Anyway, will valvoline pass the test and Basically get two oil changes for the price of one?
oil consumption light/engine shut down would have happened before your 5k and 7k oil change, 1/2 qt down doesn't sound like any issues.

"We recommend you use SAE 0W-20 API Certified Engine Oil, meeting the requirements
of FCA Material Standard MS-6395 such as Mopar, Pennzoil, and Shell Helix.
Refer to your engine oil filler cap for correct SAE grade."

according to their website, Valvoline™ Advanced Full Synthetic Motor Oil (formerly SynPower™) and Valvoline™ Modern Engine Full Synthetic Motor Oil meets MS-6395 cert.
 

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Have you had any success with arbitration because I'm having the same exact issue (and the by the way, my neighbor across the street is too)...new lease- car shuts down at 4100 miles because engine burned all of the oil. The dealer said that these engines are burning oil quickly and you need to not exceed 3500 miles per oil change. Told me to drive this defective vehicle for another 1000 miles so they can assess how much oil is being burned per 1000 miles and determine whether or not to replace motor. By the way, did anyone ever tell you at the dealer where you purchased your car that the oil MUST be changed within 3500 miles or it may shut down? Me and my neighbors dealers did not inform us of that issue.... Seems incredibly non- coincidence that my neighbor and I would have the same exact engine issue with our new leases!
 

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. . . you need to not exceed 3500 miles per oil change . . . did anyone ever tell you at the dealer where you purchased your car that the oil MUST be changed within 3500 miles or it may shut down?
No, I don't think anyone is saying oil must be changed every 3500 miles, but if you're only getting 1000/qt then you've used half your oil by that point so what's left is working extra hard and wearing out sooner, so if you're not topping it off, then your oil is going to fail sooner.

As mentioned elsewhere on this thread, oil consumption is an issue with all new technology engines, not just FCA engines. To reduce internal friction they are increasing the tolerances. Basically, the specs are literally looser. However,with a looser spec, and allowing for a few thousandths +/- then those on the outside of the limits are going to use more oil. Those on the inside limits are probably where engines were typically before this.

Conventional engines used some oil during the break-in period, even 1000 miles/qt, but by 3-4,000 that would level off to zero consumption. Not realizing that these new tech engines use more oil I checked mine anyway. What surprised me was that at 10,000 I was still running 1,000/qt.
As I said above, my oil consumption has come down to where I'd expect an old engine to be (200,000 miles). Since my Patriot went to nearly 300,000 I was used to checking it and maybe adding some after the 250,000 mark. I can't explain why mine is improving. 30,000 is an incredibly long break-in period, but maybe that's what it is. What I'm saying is, there is hope!
 

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Sorry to hear you're having such rough luck, with such a new vehicle. Wouldn't any serious repairs still be covered under warranty at least? I guess with that kind of mileage one wouldn't expect such frequent visits to the shop. 4 quarts is no small amount of consumption, and you are right that's its very plausible that damage was done.
 

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Jasmine said:
I don't think anyone is saying oil must be changed every 3500 miles
I say every 4000 :) That has been the simplest for me, because the computer asks for an oil change about every 7500 or so, round it to 8000. So I let the dealer change the oil every 8000 so the service records in their computer will be good but halfway between their intervals I change it myself, so I never go more than 4k total on a batch of oil. For my mileage that works out to twice a year I change it and twice a year their change it, no big deal. Engine always full of fresh good oil.

As long as you use a quality brand-name oil of the correct viscosity you should be good, but for warranty purposes I will only run stuff that says it meets the chrysler specs, and for simplicity I stick to one brand and variation, so its always penzoil ultra platinum for me.

Mine doesn't seem to be using much between changes any more either, but I think that my engine broke in very well. What follows is my personal two-cents (read: opinion, take it or leave it): I highly recommend after about the first 500 or 600 miles to hook up about a 2000 pound trailer and do some towing exercises for a while. Putting an engine under periods of sustained substantial load early in its life should help the piston rings seat well. If your piston rings don't seat relatively soon before the cylinder walls get polished smooth then it will be an oil burner for life with no possible cure other than a total teardown, hone and new rings.
 

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What follows is my personal two-cents (read: opinion, take it or leave it): I highly recommend after about the first 500 or 600 miles to hook up about a 2000 pound trailer and do some towing exercises for a while. Putting an engine under periods of sustained substantial load early in its life should help the piston rings seat well. If your piston rings don't seat relatively soon before the cylinder walls get polished smooth then it will be an oil burner for life with no possible cure other than a total teardown, hone and new rings.
I had a Chevy dealer tell me to drive a new car hard, i.e., heavy acceleration, probably for that reason. Also I recall the owners manual in my Plymouth Volare said to do several full-throttle accelerations early on. I forget if that was to be done before or after 200 miles.
 

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I had a Chevy dealer tell me to drive a new car hard, i.e., heavy acceleration, probably for that reason. Also I recall the owners manual in my Plymouth Volare said to do several full-throttle accelerations early on. I forget if that was to be done before or after 200 miles.
Owners manual for new compass also suggest those. Under the "ENGINE BREAK-IN RECOMMENDATIONS" section (page 229);


ENGINE BREAK-IN RECOMMENDATIONS

A long break-in period is not required for the engine and
drivetrain (transmission and axle) in your vehicle.
Drive moderately during the first 300 miles (500 km). After
the initial 60 miles (100 km), speeds up to 50 or 55 mph (80
or 90 km/h) are desirable.
While cruising, brief full-throttle acceleration within the
limits of local traffic laws contributes to a good break-in.
Wide-open throttle acceleration in low gear can be detrimental
and should be avoided​


I also get almost no oil burning and followed a rather "old fashioned" break in procedure. So I think proper engine break-in has an important role for this particular engine.
 

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I do you recommend John Elway Dealership however the way the manufacture of the Jeep Compass has addressed the procedures on handling the oil consumption due to their faulty engine design or quality of materials of my jeep compass is insulting, they have a problem they know it and they are not addressing it properly, considering the vehicle could shut off while in motion and cause a fatality this is a public safety issue. Oh my Compass is 2 years old burned more than 4 quarts of oil between oil changes
 

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I do you recommend John Elway Dealership however the way the manufacture of the Jeep Compass has addressed the procedures on handling the oil consumption due to their faulty engine design or quality of materials of my jeep compass is insulting, they have a problem they know it and they are not addressing it properly, considering the vehicle could shut off while in motion and cause a fatality this is a public safety issue.
I totally agree that the engine shutdown without warning is a safety issue. As I said previously there should be some sort of warning -- the technology exists to put a low oil warning light on the dash. My 2001 Pontiac had that, and that was nearly 20 years ago. There's no need for them to reinvent the wheel.

Oh my Compass is 2 years old burned more than 4 quarts of oil between oil changes
Well, you're not alone. You can read my posts above. After losing my 2018 Compass in a car accident I bought a 2019. So far I've got 1000 miles on her and she's only used 1/3 quart of oil so that works out to about 3000 miles/quart. It took my 2018 Compass 30,000 miles to improve to that point so maybe they have made some improvements.

IMO, even 1000 miles/quart is not unreasonable for a new engine, but the oil consumption should drop off to nothing after a few thousand miles.
 

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I totally agree that the engine shutdown without warning is a safety issue. As I said previously there should be some sort of warning -- the technology exists to put a low oil warning light on the dash. My 2001 Pontiac had that, and that was nearly 20 years ago. There's no need for them to reinvent the wheel.


Well, you're not alone. You can read my posts above. After losing my 2018 Compass in a car accident I bought a 2019. So far I've got 1000 miles on her and she's only used 1/3 quart of oil so that works out to about 3000 miles/quart. It took my 2018 Compass 30,000 miles to improve to that point so maybe they have made some improvements.

IMO, even 1000 miles/quart is not unreasonable for a new engine, but the oil consumption should drop off to nothing after a few thousand miles.
YES, THANK YOU - I have been yelling at Jeep and the dealership about the ridiculous oil consumption (oh and was told by BOTH of them that the manual says to check the oil every time you get gas so basically deal with it - this was at Thornton Jeep in Red Lion, PA just FYI) and the fact there is no light to let you know. My wife pulled out of a parking lot and the car shut off on a major highway, that is when the dealership decides to tell us the vehicle uses about a quart of oil every 2000 miles. My biggest thing is there is no warning at all! She turned the corner, the symbol for low oil flashed on the dashboard and the car shut off.....just shut off!

Jeep HAS to acknowledge this issue and either fix it (best solution is to add a sensor to check the damn oil level since EVERY new vehicle we have bought in the past 30 years or so has had one!) or give all owners free oil changes every 2000-3000 miles until the oil consumption problem goes away, if it does at higher mileage. We have under 10,000 miles on ours so far so it still sucks the oil down like a newborn baby with a bottle.

I KNOW the problem is not the dealerships fault and they are taking a ton of backlash over it so if Jeep has any balls what-so-ever they will step up, admit these engines have a serious problem and do the right thing! or they can just continue to laugh all the way to the bank at us poor suckers who didn't have the money to buy a $50,000 vehicle and went for the low end.
 

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@KnightRid I understand that you are frustrated, forums can be an outlet for that but after your temper tantrum is done you need to put on your big boy pants and find out how to move forward. FCA is better than almost anybody at ignoring people kicking and screaming and as you admitted, the local dealership is between a rock and a hard place.

If the car is really that bad then just figure out how to get out from under it.

If you are going to keep it, start recording concise and factual data about the oil consumption so you have something to talk to the dealer about that works as evidence. The published acceptable rate of oil consumption is really high but some cars do exceed that and manage to get a new motor under warranty (very few, but some).

Also some tough love: do some research and wise up a little bit. The dealership won't respond well when you demonstrate that you don't really know what you are talking about. There is no dash symbol for "low oil", there is a general malfunction indicator lamp (check engine light) and lots of other messages the screen can display but nothing specifically for "low oil". At best, maybe a "low oil pressure" message but I've never seen it myself. You seem to understand that the car lacks an oil level sensor in part of your post but surely you realize then without such a sensor its impossible to have a "low oil" light on the dashboard. Furthermore, virtually no cars have such a thing as an "oil level sensor".

best solution is to add a sensor to check the damn oil level since EVERY new vehicle we have bought in the past 30 years or so has had one!
No, they didn't. Oil level sensors aren't a real thing, and everybody at the service department knows that, so when you go around talking about imaginary parts that don't exist dealership people are going to start tuning you out. Cars have oil pressure sensors, and sometimes an oil temp sensor, and that is all. When the car detects there is no oil pressure, its a pretty good bet in this car that its because there is no oil present to pump, but it could also be for other reasons such as failed oil pump. Suffice to say, when the oil level is low enough to trigger this sensor, you are REALLY low on oil. It is not designed to be a warning that its time to add oil, you must catch it before this point.

Unless you are severely disabled, it shouldn't be too much to ask for you to pop the hood once a week and check the oil for your wife, and top it off as needed. I know, it shouldn't be necessary and its super annoying and all that, but thats the situation you are in unless you get out from under the vehicle altogether. Like I said, keep meticulous records of how much oil it uses because facts and data are about the only thing that will get you anywhere with the warranty department of FCA.

Good luck.
 
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