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[MENTION=94981]At best, maybe a "low oil pressure" message but I've never seen it myself.


Good luck.
Yeah and if you get a low oil pressure warning due to low oil level, I can pretty much guarantee that you ruined the engine for life. Oil pumps in most engines are at the near bottom of the oil pan. Assuming the pump works fine, getting low oil warning indicates the pumps is sucking in air. If there is so little oil left at the bottom of the engine that the oil pump is sucking in air, the top of the engine and probably even the crankshaft are spinning at least partially dry. Tigershark is already an engine prone to burning oil due to very narrow margin of error. If it is further wore down with in proper oiling, it will permanently burn even more oil. I wrote this here sometime ago, but to summarize that, I do believe tigershark 2.4 engine has an oil burning problem. But for many the engine would stop burning oil if they continued maintaining proper oil level. In my case it took close to 10k miles for oil consumption to stop, I have read some users even had longer periods. You can say the engine has a very long break-in period. But if you dont care and let the engine oil-starve, it will turn into a permanent issue. So some people do turn a temporary problem into a permanant one by being too stubborn.

And yeah, low oil lights are very very rare. I have seen cars with low oil lights, but they are often unreliable and difficult to maintain. Engine oil is not an easy materiel to measure the level inside a metal box. It is designed to adhere to metal surfaces, so even after you turn off the engine, it will form a thin film over everything inside the engine. This makes getting a reliable reading difficult as you might have almost no oil left, bit the oil might still stick to the sensor and give a false reading. You can also only get a reading for an turned of engine, as a running engine has oil splashing everywhere. Cars that do have "reliable" oil sensors mostly have them inside what you might call a separate u-tube manometer that is in equilibrium with oil level inside the engine (by reliable I mean ones that can read oil for a powered engine). As the oil inside the u-tube manometer is not circulated (due to design it is an attachment outside of the loop), gunk, dirt, shaved metal etc. often builds up in the U-tube and clogs it. After that you will either get a false low oil reading or no low oil reading even if you have no oil, depending on if the oil is trapped around the sensor or cant get to the sensor. Cleaning (or replacing) it can be difficult as it involves accessing to something inside the engine block, or something on the engine block / oil pan if it is designed with ease of access in mind.
 

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Uh, yes, there is such a thing as a low oil level warning light. My 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix had one that came on if it was down a quart. It wasn't an oil pressure warning, it was an oil level warning. I didn't start to see it until after 200,000 miles, but was there, it worked, and it was accurate. It did not, repeat did NOT, just drop dead. I don't know how far I might had driven the the warning was enough for me to get to a store and pick up a quart.
 

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Uh, yes, there is such a thing as a low oil level warning light. My 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix had one that came on if it was down a quart. It wasn't an oil pressure warning, it was an oil level warning. I didn't start to see it until after 200,000 miles, but was there, it worked, and it was accurate. It did not, repeat did NOT, just drop dead. I don't know how far I might had driven the the warning was enough for me to get to a store and pick up a quart.
Yep it is not like they are nonexistent, but they are rare. Most German cars also have low oil level warnings, I think some of these only measure the oil before a cold crank and some have multiple sensors to reduce false readings. But a quick google search on 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix low oil warning results in a ton of complains about this warning coming on even with sufficient oil in the engine. This is the issue with such systems, they are prone to false readings.
 

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Yes, it is inaccurate for me to say "no cars have oil level sensors", but I agree with Tripod very few cars have them and the few that do/did never seemed to work reliably. Sorry for making generalizations.
 

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Yep it is not like they are nonexistent, but they are rare. Most German cars also have low oil level warnings, I think some of these only measure the oil before a cold crank and some have multiple sensors to reduce false readings. But a quick google search on 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix low oil warning results in a ton of complains about this warning coming on even with sufficient oil in the engine. This is the issue with such systems, they are prone to false readings.
Nothing is perfect, including warning lights. Most of them work and a few give false readings. I did not have any complaints with how mine functioned. The first time I saw it I was driving to NY with my Father. We stopped for lunch in VT and when we got back in the car the low oil light message was illuminated. I checked with the dipstick, and yup, it was short 1.5 quarts. We were in a significant sized town and it was easy to find a store that sold motor oil. After that I kept an eye on it and it only illuminated a few times in the next 50,000 miles. Each time it was truthin'.

My suggestion is that they set the trip point for the oil level a little higher and not shut the engine down when its activated. Maybe it could illuminate at -1.5 quarts and shut down at -2.0 quarts. The danger of just shutting down with no warning is obvious. They're gonna get sued, and the plaintiff is going to win. However, 'winning' may not come till months or years after somebody dies.

They'd be better to just let the engine seize than to kill someone simply to save a piece of machinery. We can replace an engine, but how do we replace a family member?

I'm not a lawyer, but maybe someone should start legal action BEFORE there's a tragedy.
 

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Nothing is perfect, including warning lights. Most of them work and a few give false readings. I did not have any complaints with how mine functioned. The first time I saw it I was driving to NY with my Father. We stopped for lunch in VT and when we got back in the car the low oil light message was illuminated. I checked with the dipstick, and yup, it was short 1.5 quarts. We were in a significant sized town and it was easy to find a store that sold motor oil. After that I kept an eye on it and it only illuminated a few times in the next 50,000 miles. Each time it was truthin'.

My suggestion is that they set the trip point for the oil level a little higher and not shut the engine down when its activated. Maybe it could illuminate at -1.5 quarts and shut down at -2.0 quarts. The danger of just shutting down with no warning is obvious. They're gonna get sued, and the plaintiff is going to win. However, 'winning' may not come till months or years after somebody dies.

They'd be better to just let the engine seize than to kill someone simply to save a piece of machinery. We can replace an engine, but how do we replace a family member?

I'm not a lawyer, but maybe someone should start legal action BEFORE there's a tragedy.

I believe it would be very difficult to sue the manufacturing and win even if a deadly accident happens because of this. The reason for this is there is a dip stick for the oil level. Manufacturer would just argue that it is the owners responsibility to check and maintain proper oil level and the engine has means to do this. Since the oil loss is not happening at a catastrophic rate that is impossible to prevent, they would win the case on the basis that accident resulted from owner negligence. If the oil loss was happening at a catastrophic rate, like if the oil pan leaked the whole oil in few hours, it would have been a different story since you could check the oil in the morning and lose all of it in few hours while driving. But in this case, for even the worse engines, it still takes couple of thousand miles to become a safety concern and the owner manual suggest checking the oil level much more frequently than that.

I think this might be one of the reasons why many manufactures avoid low oil warning systems. If the system malfunctions and fails to warn the driver about the low oil and this causes an accident, the manufacturer would be liable since their warning system failed and caused an accident.

I agree that the engine should not intentionally shut off under these conditions, but I am not sure if this is an intentional shutoff to prevent damage, or the engine simply shuts of due to the lack of oil. We know that this engine has hydraulic lifters that use engine oil as hydraulic fluid. If there is not enough oil, this system can fail and the engine will shut of since the valves will not open. So I am not convinced if this is an intentional shutoff, or if the ECM just detects this failure and warns about the imminent engine shutoff. Engine might turn on after wards since the remaining oil returns to the pan might be enough to suffice the hydraulic needs.

I think one component that you can sue and win after an accident would be the transmission since it has no dipstick. If it causes an accident due to the lack of fluid, the manufacturer would be liable since the owner has no means to check or add fluid.
 

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So if you love your family, buckle them in and check the oil. Strangely I never thought of the dipstick as a safety device. :think:
Yeah I think it is a good practice to occasionally check the levels of all the fluid. I try to open the hood at least every other week and to check the levels of all fluids like the coolant, engine oil and the break fluid (its a shame that transmission doesn't have a dipstick). I also inspect everything visible, like I check if radiator hoses has any leaks/residue around them, are there any splashes of oil anywhere inside the hood. Finally I check under the car to see if anything leaked down. This whole process takes about 2-3 mins at max and you dont even have to touch anything aide from the oil dipstick. I actually check "cold" the oil level before cranking the engine, I know it doesn't give a correct reading but if it is on the crosshatch for the cold engine, it will expand about ~1/3-1/4 qts higher after warming up.
 

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I just went through this. I noticed mine was burning too much oil and went to the dealer twice to complain. They told me that they know about the issue and that I have to to an oil consumption test. I said no, I don't have time to come into the dealer every 1000 miles since I drive a lot for work. Called FCA and complain, within a week FCA had a new engine at my dealer. It was painless. Now im having issues with the AC not working. Im starting to get fed up with the car overall.
 

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I just went through this. I noticed mine was burning too much oil and went to the dealer twice to complain. They told me that they know about the issue and that I have to to an oil consumption test. I said no, I don't have time to come into the dealer every 1000 miles since I drive a lot for work. Called FCA and complain, within a week FCA had a new engine at my dealer. It was painless. Now im having issues with the AC not working. Im starting to get fed up with the car overall.
I'm impressed they gave you a new engine so easily. Others on here have jumped through hoops only to be told to go pound sand.

I'd bet dollars to donuts (these days approaching parity) that the a/c got messed up during the engine change.
 

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I am also experiencing this same issue. I bought a 2018 Jeep Compass in March 2018. After 7,500 (manufacturers recommendation) I get first oil change. Guys in Service dept at dealership say, "yeah, you should be fine to go 8-10K between oil changes. So about 6,000 miles after first oil change, I get a low oil pressure warning light, not the warning that it's time to get the oil changed, but a low oil pressure warning light. The next day on my way to take vehicle to dealership to get it looked at, it stalls out on me as I make a turn. I get it started again and get it to the dealership and explain the problem. The guy at service desk tells me that I need to check the oil, that it is part of an car owner's responsibility to periodically check the oil. I say, 'sure I get that, but we're not talking about a 10 year old vehicle with 150K on it. We're talking about a brand new vehicle where the manufacturer and the dealership says I should be fine going 8,000 miles." So I reluctantly relent and let it go. To make a long story short, have had oil consumption test done where I have had to bring in the vehicle every 500 miles (total inconvenience) and was told no sign of concerning burning of oil. The vehicle now has 38,000 miles on it. I have to drive around with 2 spare quarts of oil and make sure I get the oil change at 5,000 miles or low oil pressure light comes on and I risk vehicle shutting off. I wouldn't have issue with this if I was told from the get go that this vehicle requires oil changes every 4-5K miles, but this was not the case. Not sure where to with this from here.
 

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Hey, it is what it is man. Chrysler is really struggling to keep up with the power per ci that others like Honda are able to produce out of their motors. This is one of the things they did to reduce internal friction to squeeze more power and economy out of a small four-cylinder. This motor is making around 50% more power than similar sized engines in decades past. Truth be told not all of Honda's engines are without their flaws either (thinking of my wife's turbo civic, which they have recently extended the warranty on voluntarily due to design flaws).

4k oil changes work perfect for me, but mine has never burned much oil to start with.
 

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yeah, I'm finding it is what it is. Just really disappointing. One of the reasons I buy new cars is so in theory I don't have to spend as much time at the service department. Now I have to get oil changes at almost twice the frequency that I anticipated, and the rate at which the vehicle is burning oil is concerning. Seems ridiculous that I need to have 2 spare quarts of oil in my vehicle at all times to top off the oil within the mileage interval that the manufacturer is recommending to have it changed. And I'm sure when they are making sales, dealerships aren't telling consumers that they're going to need to monitor the oil levels and get the oil changed more frequently than what the manufacturer calls for.
 

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New 2019 Compass Oil Consumption

After reading all the scary and sad posts on this issue on the various forums, I got worried and filled oil exactly to top of dip stick hash mark at 2578 miles. Total miles driven since this top off is 1878 and current total drop from full mark is 3/16 inch. Hash mark is 3/4 (12/16) inch long and assuming that this represents 1 qt., the projected 1 qt. miles to the lower of the hash mark is 7512 miles ( 4 x 1878 ).

Took a 709 mile trip this past holiday weekend and the oil on the dip stick dropped approx. 1/16 inch. Works out to a tad bit more miles than the projected consumption above...( 12 x 709 = 8508 miles ) but confirms that this engine is not using much oil so far.

Seems like whatever was going on may have been corrected on the newer trucks...anyone got a 2019 with this issue?

Baja-D
 

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I am only guessing but I am thinking that it doesn't really matter if its a 2017, 2018, 2019, etc. I don't think the build specs of the motor have ever changed, I think there is just that much potential variation in their acceptable tolerances when they are mass-producing hundreds of thousands of these motors as fast as they can.

They are churning out all these motors (have been for a long time), they have defined minimum and maximum tolerances for things like piston rings, some of the motors get really close to those extremes and still pass QA. If anything, there is a chance that they have tightened up the specs for what will pass acceptance criteria but I doubt it, I think its just a bit of a lottery when you get one, possibly exacerbated by how you drive it the first few hundred or couple thousand miles (ie, break-in).

They have been using the 2.4 motor on all sorts of cars since long before the 2nd Gen Compass came about and all the other FCA cars that use it have had the same issues. They didn't fix it for the Dart, or the Renegade, no reason to think they are doing anything different now with the Compass and the current Renegades other than that slight possibility that maybe they tightened up what will pass inspection. Its possible, it just seems more likely that you simply "won the coin toss" when you got your particular 2019. If you account for the natural tendency that people without problems don't sign up for forums and speak out nearly as much as people who are having problems, we could guesstimate that less than 1% of the motors produced end up at the bad end of oil burning. Not enough for FCA to care.

I predict they will keep going as they have been and before too long there will be people on here "My 2019 shut down blah blah oil pressure" and some months after that it will be "My 2020 shut down blah blah oil pressure", and the cycle will go on and on. Might actually be fun to post a banner in the top of the forum that reads "This forum has gone X days without someone signing up specifically to complain about oil consumption" :p
 

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...anyone got a 2019 with this issue?

Baja-D
I had a 2018 with the problem. Like you I just started carrying 2 quarts in the trunk JIC. A nuisance I could live with. After about 25,000 miles it settled down to where I could get between oil changes without adding any but I still kept a close eye on the dipstick.

Then <crunch> happened. My 2018 got totaled (we weren't hurt so the Compass is safe IMO) and I decided to replace it with a 2019 Compass.

My 2019 does not use a drop of oil. Before the first oil change it was down a tad on the stick, but not nearly down a quart. As with any new engine I expected some oil consumption and that's about what I'd expect -- maybe a quart in the first 10,000, miles, most of it in the first 5,000. Since that first change its used no oil at all. Totally different from my 2018.

So I think FCA saw the light and tightened up the tolerances. My overall fuel economy has been better with the 2019 but I never got the super-high numbers I'd occasionally get with my 2018. Maybe those numbers were just flukes.

PS, my 2018 used to make a grinding noise from the transmission between 30-45MPH. A computer update moved the noise up about 15MPH so road noise pretty well drowned it out. My 2019 doesn't make the noise at all, or if it does its so faint as to not be noticeable. Again, I think FCA got the message from their owners and maybe from sites like this.
 

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I like the banner idea....perhaps also one with "What's the biggest tires I can put on my (insert model here) Jeep?" post. ;) Glad I did not buy the used 2018 truck I was looking at in case someone had given up on the issue and traded it back in. Only two issues so far in the first six months, steering wheel is slightly to the left when going straight and the idle is rough when stopped in gear (which seems to be a common characteristic).

Baja-D
 

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Jasmine said:
So I think FCA saw the light and tightened up the tolerances.
Perhaps but perhaps your sample size of two cars is too small to really support the conclusion you are trying to draw. We have people on here with 2nd gens from every year in both camps, do we not? Some have major oil consumption issues, some don't. 2019 is just ending so it will be a while before the 2020 owners are chiming in but I am guessing they will chime in once enough time has passed, and it will be the same old song.

I'm just a pessimist. Or maybe I'm just bitter that if they didn't build me a good car in 2017 then they shouldn't build anybody a better car the year after :p I demand equality, everyone should have equally crappy cars! :rotfl:
 

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FWIW My 2019 Compass has a bit over 6,000 miles now and the oil level has only dropped 1/3 in the hash marks. Not enough to add oil yet.

Mike
 

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Perhaps but perhaps your sample size of two cars is too small to really support the conclusion you are trying to draw. We have people on here with 2nd gens from every year in both camps, do we not? Some have major oil consumption issues, some don't. 2019 is just ending so it will be a while before the 2020 owners are chiming in but I am guessing they will chime in once enough time has passed, and it will be the same old song.

I'm just a pessimist. Or maybe I'm just bitter that if they didn't build me a good car in 2017 then they shouldn't build anybody a better car the year after :p I demand equality, everyone should have equally crappy cars! :rotfl:
I admit my sample size is small, but I'm probably one of only a few who can honestly share an owners experience with both years that close together. My impression on this site is that the complaints have diminished since the 2019s came out. There was quite a flurry of posts when I first joined up with my 2018 and I was one of the complainers.

Maybe I'm an optimist as far as FCA correcting the problem, but I'm a pessimist when it comes to them ever admitting the problem existed with a significant number. The liability would be fantastic if they had to start replacing engines all over the country (or world).
 
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