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The 2nd Gen Compass just hasn't had enough years in the wild yet to say, not enough data.

The Renegades have had people reporting bad oil burners steady since 2014, so if magically the 2019+ Renegades quit churning out a percentage of oil burning 2.4s, THAT would be evidence I would accept because there are enough years of data to plot a curve. Even then, I don't feel like we will be able to close the books on that one until 2021.
 

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No matter what year, your odds of getting a second compass in a row that burns oil was always extremely low, thats why it doesn't seem to me like that stands as valid supporting evidence to the idea that FCA is producing these motors any differently.
 

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Well I think we can all agree that some do and some don't. And the difference can be quite dramatic especially for the poor "do" owners. :)
Baja-D
 

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No matter what year, your odds of getting a second compass in a row that burns oil was always extremely low, thats why it doesn't seem to me like that stands as valid supporting evidence to the idea that FCA is producing these motors any differently.
The odds of buying a new vehicle that can't make it between oil changes without adding some are pretty low too, but the Compass seems to be defying those odds. I don't think I've ever had a vehicle, even some pretty old ones with very high miles, that used as much oil as my 2018 Compass. Thankfully my 2019 seems nice and tight.

Well, I did have a '68 Chevy that used a case of oil laying a smokescreen from Hartford to Pittsburgh, but that was a leak that was easily corrected once I got where I was going. (Sorry if any of you were behind me.)
 

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Jasmine said:
The odds of buying a new vehicle that can't make it between oil changes without adding some are pretty low too, but the Compass seems to be defying those odds.
I understand why people feel that way but when you look at the hard numbers.. even if we get one new forum member per month who complains of coil consumption issues and figure for every one who actually joins to speak up a good handful go unheard from.. that seems like a continuous plague from our point of view until you remember they are averaging fourteen-thousand of these vehicles sold every month.

So less than a tenth of a percent, by my rough math. I agree is should be even less than that but my point is very few vehicles sold are actually having this issue, its just blown out of proportion by how vocal the poor folks who win the lottery are about it.
 

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I understand why people feel that way but when you look at the hard numbers.. even if we get one new forum member per month who complains of coil consumption issues and figure for every one who actually joins to speak up a good handful go unheard from.. that seems like a continuous plague from our point of view until you remember they are averaging fourteen-thousand of these vehicles sold every month.

So less than a tenth of a percent, by my rough math. I agree is should be even less than that but my point is very few vehicles sold are actually having this issue, its just blown out of proportion by how vocal the poor folks who win the lottery are about it.
True. If every Compass or Renegade had the problem FCA would have to do something about it. As it is there are only a few -- not enough to be statistically significant. Forums like this are where people with problems come to vent and ask for advice, so we probably see a disproportionate share on here.
 

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Looks like I might be having to get a new motor... it's starting to chatter. This last weekend the Jeep was throwing "Low Oil Pressure" whenever I made a turn and I am well within my oil change limits, like maybe 2k miles out of 5k and I pull into gas station, check oil, nothing registering on stick. Take it immediately to dealer just down the road, they confirm it's 4 quarts low on oil. They gave me a free oil change, said to come back in 1k miles and see if it's still burning oil. Meantime, the two days it went without oil more than likely screwed it up. It was never leaking any.

Now the motor makes a distinct value and rod noise. I'm so done with this car... what a piece of s**t. Car has 7700 miles on it. Nothing but heartburn with it. Calling to file arbitration on it. BTW, it's a lease..
Any success with this. Our 2018 is doing the same ****. Taking it in for the 1k test today. I'm so done with the **** car. We just had to get it rewired in the summer. After this test garbage is over we are trading it's sorry ass in.
 

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the engine on my 2018 Compass was replaced at 18,000 miles due to oil consumption. The car was in the dealer service department for 6 weeks. The dealer had a few crates of new engines for other Compass customers receiving new engines. Since the engine has been replaced, I still add a quart of oil every 1000 miles. I also noticed, since receiving the new engine, the transmission shifts erratically. The Compass is not a fun car to drive, own or lease.
 

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the engine on my 2018 Compass was replaced at 18,000 miles due to oil consumption. The car was in the dealer service department for 6 weeks. The dealer had a few crates of new engines for other Compass customers receiving new engines. Since the engine has been replaced, I still add a quart of oil every 1000 miles. I also noticed, since receiving the new engine, the transmission shifts erratically. The Compass is not a fun car to drive, own or lease.
That is marginally acceptable for a well-worn engine, say 200,000+ miles. Any worse than that its time for a ring job. If your engine is brand spanking new then a quart after 1000 is not unreasonable, but oil consumption should drop off to zilch after a few thousand miles. It took my 2018 Compass to 30,000 miles to improve to 3000/qt. Not good, but it wasn't bad enough to do anything about it -- I just kept a couple spare quarts in the trunk. My 2019 has gone 6500 and the oil is barely showing down on the stick. Time for a change anyway.

As for the tranny, maybe you can reset the software? Both my 2018 and 2019 Compasses shift strangely when decelerating (theres a big gap between 5 and 4 when descending a hill), but smooth when accelerating.
 

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Perhaps but perhaps your sample size of two cars is too small to really support the conclusion you are trying to draw. We have people on here with 2nd gens from every year in both camps, do we not? Some have major oil consumption issues, some don't. 2019 is just ending so it will be a while before the 2020 owners are chiming in but I am guessing they will chime in once enough time has passed, and it will be the same old song.

I'm just a pessimist. Or maybe I'm just bitter that if they didn't build me a good car in 2017 then they shouldn't build anybody a better car the year after :p I demand equality, everyone should have equally crappy cars! :rotfl:
2020 here. 0.5 quarts added by 1,200 miles. Bought i with 11 miles on it. Went and purchased two more quarts to have on hand. Hoping it is just a break in period.
 

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2020 here. 0.5 quarts added by 1,200 miles. Bought i with 11 miles on it. Went and purchased two more quarts to have on hand. Hoping it is just a break in period.
Well congratulations krobinson2014. I guess you are our first victim, I mean complaintant, of a 2020 Compass. Hopefully you're right and its only the break-in period. If you follow my other posts, you've read that my 2018 got to where it could almost make it between oil changes (5000 miles). A nuisance to be sure, and a disappointment in a new vehicle, but in the eternal scheme, it was a problem I could live with.
 

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krobinson2014 said:
2020 here. 0.5 quarts added by 1,200 miles.
Its like I said before, not enough time has passed and not enough data is available yet to draw any conclusions about whether FCA has done anything to address this issue. I still believe the data suggests they haven't/won't do anything and will continue to produce the same engine the same way they have been doing it since 2014.
 

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Its like I said before, not enough time has passed and not enough data is available yet to draw any conclusions about whether FCA has done anything to address this issue. I still believe the data suggests they haven't/won't do anything and will continue to produce the same engine the same way they have been doing it since 2014.
I believe you are correct. I was at my dealer last week to pick up some touch up paint for my new Grand Cherokee (I turned my Compass lease in before the Holidays) and my salesman told me the dealer has seen numerous 2020 Compass models in service with oil consumption problems. Like you, I doubt FCA will do anything to correct this situation because, I believe FCA is just concerned about making a sale and does not really care what happens after the sale. Compass sales were down the 4th quarter of last year - hopefully consumers are leaning to avoid this car.
 

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I am hoping since I am being proactive with mine and adding oil as needed it won't turn into something worse i.e engine stalling making issues even worse. I really like the Compass.
 

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I have just over 17,000 miles on my 2019 Trailhawk and my oil has never dropped below the top of the hash marks. I either got lucky or they made a change for the 2019 model year.
 

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Bill Gaston Jr said:
I either got lucky or they made a change for the 2019 model year.
Not to pick on you specifically bill but this is exactly the kind of invalid train of thought I am always talking about. Your one lone example means nothing, entirely anecdotal.

If less than 1 % of 2.4 liter powered Compasses have this problem then odds of you getting an oil burner were always extremely low (I believe the percentage is far less than 1% even, just picking easy numbers). You aren't lucky, you are normal, sitting squarely in the 99.x% of everyone else who got a normal-spec engine that works as intended. No conclusions about FCA doing anything about their oil issues can be drawn from your particular car because the only possibilities were
a) Get a completely normal engine (99.x% probability or greater)
b) Get an oil burner, which would add to the evidence that they have not made any changes regarding this issue.

Its the people who find themselves with an oil burner who have won some crappy reverse-lottery. We are getting reports of them for every model year, including the latest 2020 models now. That evidence suggests nothing changed at the engine factory for 2019 or 2020 (or not enough changed).
 

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I just wonder why this problem has never surfaced in other vehicles before now. I've been on jeeppatriot.com for 10 years and never heard of this problem. Now with the 2nd Gen 2.4 oil consumption is an issue -- not for most, but suddenly for a significant minority.

If 1% of the Compasess started having problems with coolant systems losing juice it would hardly matter in the eternal scheme of things, but strangely no one had this problem before and then 1% do.
 

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I just wonder why this problem has never surfaced in other vehicles before now. I've been on jeeppatriot.com for 10 years and never heard of this problem. Now with the 2nd Gen 2.4 oil consumption is an issue -- not for most, but suddenly for a significant minority.

If 1% of the Compasess started having problems with coolant systems losing juice it would hardly matter in the eternal scheme of things, but strangely no one had this problem before and then 1% do.
The Patriot was a DaimlerChrysler vehicle which, if I recall, had a 2.0L engine. This vehicle had nothing to do with FIAT. After Fiat took control, engineering became chaotic with most new designs falling short. The 2.4L TigerShark engine is pretty much an abortion. The Dodge Dart, Chrysler 200, Jeep Cherokee, Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Compass all suffer from this poorly designed and engineered engine. And with this issue still present on 2020 models, you have to wonder what Fiat has done to rectify this. Absolutely nothing. Fix It Again Tony.
 

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While not identical, the 2.0 and 2.4 World Engine and the 2.4 Tigershark are all kissin' cousins. The difference in displacement between the 2.0 and 2.4 is accomplished with different sized cylinder sleeves. Fiat did work on the valves (possibly necessitating the change in lubrication?) to improve Tigershark performance over the World Engine but the block is the same and the old and new 2.4s have the same bore X stroke.

We know the lubrication is accomplished now by spraying not squirting. Engine oil is also used in the hydraulics. Seems to me the type and use of the motor oil is the biggest (huge) difference between the two. I suspect that's where the root of the problem lies. If oil was leaking we'd see spots under our vehicles; if we were burning it we'd see smoke out the tailpipe and the sensors would be going crazy.
 
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