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BTW both the 2.0 and 2.4 were available in the Patriot. I've owned Patriots with both.
 

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Jasmine said:
I just wonder why this problem has never surfaced in other vehicles before now.
You've been under a rock, perhaps?

Like others pointed out its been well documented in every FCA car that has used this generation of the 2.4 engine since 2014, most closely notable to us would be that every year of the Jeep Renegade and the Jeep Cherokees equipped with this motor, have lots of people on forums crying about oil consumption same as our members. You can google it up in just a few seconds. The problem has been at the surface for a long time just maybe not in places you or any of the rest of us really look.

[QUOT=JasmineE]While not identical, the 2.0 and 2.4 World Engine and the 2.4 Tigershark are all kissin' cousins. [/QUOTE]

They aren't the same though. In the endless quest to improve power and efficiency and emissions they have pushed their once okay-ish design to its limits and this generation of that motor, starting around 2014 with the dodge darts and the jeep renegades, have been non-stop proof every since that they have done something bad along the way and the fact that its never fixed makes me think its not so much "they choose not to do anything about it" as much as perhaps "they are incapable of fixing it". That could be the case. They simply don't seem to be able to produce the power per ci that other manufactures are capable of and when they try to reach for it we get engines like this. Who knows.
 

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You've been under a rock, perhaps?

Like others pointed out its been well documented in every FCA car that has used this generation of the 2.4 engine . . .
If you read my post I agreed with most of what you went on to say. I was referring to the 2nd gen 2.4 -- the 1st generation did not have the oil consumption problem. When the 2nd gen 2.4 came out, so did the oil (at least in some). I suspect it is the modifications they did to the World Engine to turn it into the Tigershark (Kittenfish) engine that has led to the oil loss.

I'm no engineer but when something is working fine, then it gets changed, then problems happen, its probably due to the changes.
 

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What gets me is this issue has been present since 2014. Maybe even before 2014. Yet, FCA has done absolutely nothing to fix the issue. Every once in a while, Jeep Cares will offer someone assistance on this forum but, the Jeep Care comments are nothing more than a standard template reply. So, Jeep Customer Care is pretty much worthless. FCA has proven they are pretty much useless trying to fix the oil consumption problem. What are the engineers doing? Standing around an engine with their thumbs in their a$$? It’s been 5 years and engines are still consuming oil. And the American auto makers wonder why their market share has been lost to the foreign brands.
 

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You said it Rockdog. Back when we bought our Compass I tried to do some research on how the Renegades were holding up and what common issues they had (since the MP Compass was brand new in 2017 and had no history of its own)

I admit I found and read about the Renegade oil issues, and delusionally thought to myself "Okay, well surely they have addressed that issue by now and won't possibly be an issue for me in our Compass." And I etched that thought into my brain and gave it no more worry. Well 42 thousand miles later ours doesn't use too much oil but it does use oil. The only reason I don't have to add to top mine off is because I change the oil and filter ever 4k. Otherwise I would be needing to add oil every 4k miles, somewhere between half a quart to 3/4 of a quart.

Not the end of the world I'm really one of the fortunate ones but it does speak very badly for FCA in general and reduces the likelihood that I will ever purchase another one of their products. It feels like this is mostly isolated to their cheap or bargain series vehicles though, so I'd like to believe its safe to step up to something like a Grand Cherokee BUT then their haunting electrical issues concern me too so, very iffy whether or not I would purchase Jeep/Chrysler/Dodge again.
 

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You said it Rockdog. Back when we bought our Compass I tried to do some research on how the Renegades were holding up and what common issues they had (since the MP Compass was brand new in 2017 and had no history of its own)

I admit I found and read about the Renegade oil issues, and delusionally thought to myself "Okay, well surely they have addressed that issue by now and won't possibly be an issue for me in our Compass." And I etched that thought into my brain and gave it no more worry. Well 42 thousand miles later ours doesn't use too much oil but it does use oil. The only reason I don't have to add to top mine off is because I change the oil and filter ever 4k. Otherwise I would be needing to add oil every 4k miles, somewhere between half a quart to 3/4 of a quart.

Not the end of the world I'm really one of the fortunate ones but it does speak very badly for FCA in general and reduces the likelihood that I will ever purchase another one of their products. It feels like this is mostly isolated to their cheap or bargain series vehicles though, so I'd like to believe its safe to step up to something like a Grand Cherokee BUT then their haunting electrical issues concern me too so, very iffy whether or not I would purchase Jeep/Chrysler/Dodge again.
looking at the FCA product lineup, any vehicle with connections to the DaimlerChrysler era will be a better vehicle. Despite the age of these vehicles, the underpinnings and engineering are much better. Yes, the Dodge Journey is an ugly 12 year old car but, it runs well. The Dodge Durango, Jeep Grand Cherokee are strong, problem free vehicles. Same stands true for the Dodge Challenger and Charger. Rams trucks are killing it. The Wrangler and Cherokee, despite being launched during the Fiat era, were mostly engineered and designed during the DaimlerChrysler years.
The Jeep Renegade, Jeep Compass, Fiat 500, Fiat 500x, Chrysler 200 and the Dodge Dart are all products engineered after Fiat took control of Chrysler. The Chaotic Fiat Engineering process doing everything as cheaply as possible with little regards to customer satisfaction has produced lackluster vehicles filled with problems and issues. Now, the Dart and 200 have been killed. The Renegade is receiving a facelift as is the Compass but, none of the problems inherent to these vehicles have been engineered out. Fiat dropped the 500 models from the US market. The above mentioned DaimlerChrysler vehicles are getting old and one has to ask, “What takes FiatChrysler so long to redesign a vehicle”? The new WL Grand Cherokee is forthcoming but, this is an all new Grand Cherokee engineered by Fiat....with this be nothing more than a larger Jeep Compass? Additionally, FCA continues to use the lousy ZF transmission and other poorly engineered supplier parts. In other words, Fiat has pretty much destroyed the former Chrysler. Now, by slapping a Jeep nameplate on the Compass (Fiat 500X) and the Renegade (Fiat 500), it is safe to say, Fiat is screwing up the Jeep nameplate.
 

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I don't know if they are in denial, but it seems the new 2/4 has been around long enough they should realize there's a significant number of vehicles with this oil consumption problem.

As for the ZF I'm not sure its junk yet. I'll have a better idea in a couple years. It shifts forward smoothly, but there is a lag, no doubt. With that many gears (to satisfy the CAFE standards imposed by the government you voted for) we can't be surprised that these have some problems. The big thing for me is I want it to last for 200,000 miles.

FIAT left the us market decades ago when we discovered what the initials F.I.A.T. stood for. I hope they learned their lesson.
 

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I understand, mikeexelby, and do genuinely apologize for the trouble you've encountered thus far. Should you change your mind, don't hesitate to connect with us via direct message.

Jasmine
Jeep Social Care Specialist
I have had the same exact problem. I have reached out to our local dealership and have done oil consumption tests and they then replaced the PCV Valve. Continued another round of oil consumption tests and oil was still low. My vehicle also stalled on me three times. I have a case out with Jeep but they are not helping in anyway and I have not heard back other than saying we’re still reaching out to our rep and received no help. This has been going in for a couple months.
 

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I understand, mikeexelby, and do genuinely apologize for the trouble you've encountered thus far. Should you change your mind, don't hesitate to connect with us via direct message.

Jasmine
Jeep Social Care Specialist
Just so you know, Jasmine above is a different Jasmine.
 

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I have had the same exact problem. I have reached out to our local dealership and have done oil consumption tests and they then replaced the PCV Valve. Continued another round of oil consumption tests and oil was still low. My vehicle also stalled on me three times. I have a case out with Jeep but they are not helping in anyway and I have not heard back other than saying we’re still reaching out to our rep and received no help. This has been going in for a couple months.
Good luck with Jeep Customer Care....they were useless when I had my issues. As for the Jeep Social Care Specialist...they are useless as well.
 

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Sayre, give 'em a chance. Social care has helped others. We can't know the circumstances of everyone, but it can't hurt to have someone from corporate on your side.
 

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I a
Good luck with Jeep Customer Care....they were useless when I had my issues. As for the Jeep Social Care Specialist...they are useless as well.
Im quickly realizing that I am not going to reactive any help from Jeep and am unfortunately stuck with a vehicle that has problems. Thanks for the feedback
 

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Im quickly realizing that I am not going to reactive any help from Jeep and am unfortunately stuck with a vehicle that has problems. Thanks for the feedback
I would keep pushing Jeep Customer Care - keep in mind however, JCC is not FCA. JCC is outsourced to a company that employs people to read off a script. You need to take the car back to the dealer and insist the dealer service manager contact the FCA service rep that handles dealers in your zone. Document everything. Keep pushing and eventually, they may buy you out of your lease or purchase.
 

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For those of you who are having oil consumption problems, I have come across a web site for a law group which is apparently investigating the possibility of a class action law suite. Search for "Jeep Compass Oil Consumption", you should find it.
 

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For those of you who are having oil consumption problems, I have come across a web site for a law group which is apparently investigating the possibility of a class action law suite. Search for "Jeep Compass Oil Consumption", you should find it.
Thank you for the information.
 

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For those of you who are having oil consumption problems, I have come across a web site for a law group which is apparently investigating the possibility of a class action law suite. Search for "Jeep Compass Oil Consumption", you should find it.
So you go to court with all the documentation and anecdotal evidence. The defense says, "Yup, that's how we designed it: 500 miles/quart. Most Compasses will do better, but some may barely achieve the standard." They can even point to a few engines they've replaced and say, "We've taken care of those actually who fell short." They can show that other manufacturers have similar consumption rates to prove FCA is on par with the industry. "The government has set the CAFE standards. This is what we're doing to comply with the law."

In the rebuttal your lawyer says, "Cars didn't used to be this bad." The defense responds, "You can't hold modern cars to the standards of the 1940s," and then the churn out a ream of documents showing the gains in power, torque, and longevity across the board. Heck, even in the 1960s it was not uncommon for engines to have a ring job, a valve job or even a total rebuild before 100,000 miles.

In closing your lawyer runs with a sob story about the financial struggles of a single mother who thinks she needs a new engine. The defense responds, "There's a dipstick for a reason. The owners manual says to check it. Top off the oil as needed and this engine is good for a quarter million miles. With the money you're saving by the improved fuel economy you can afford a extra quart of oil every so often." Defense rests.
 

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My understanding is that as a part of the strive for higher and higher fuel economy the tightness of piston rings has been relaxed in many recent engines, reducing internal friction is a general benefit and part of how this modern motor can be more powerful and economical than larger engines of yesteryear but it comes at a cost and in this case the cost is a small amount of expected oil consumption and increased contamination of the engine oil during normal usage.

Yes I'm afraid it really is expected that these types of engines will "use" some oil between oil changes. For us old-timers this is a hard concept to grasp, that anyone would purposefully engineer a motor "loose enough" to burn a bit of oil but you can google this yourself, I'm not making it up. I know I sound like I'm guzzling the service department bs-koolaid again but seriously, check into it, this is a real thing.

Some modern mass-produced economy-minded engines are designed and expected to consume a tiny bit of oil between changes. This is part of why we have such a small engine with such a massive oil capacity. 5.5 quarts is a LOT of oil for a small four cylinder but the extra capacity is, in part, because its expected that the oil level is going to work its way slowly down the hash marks on the stick over the course of a 7500 mile interval.

Now, its not supposed to use enough between oil changes to go under the add mark of the dipstick or be a problem. The intention is to loose maybe a half a quart to not more than one quart over the time from one oil change to the next, and thats at the high end. Ideally we'd be talking more like 1/4 to 1/3 quart, which is the neighborhood my engine seems to be in. Actually, I think mine would be right at a half a quart probably if it ever went a full interval between changes, but I never give it the chance.

After reading articles describing how and why some modern engines use a small amount of oil on purpose, I resolved to double up on my recommended oil changes which basically just puts me near what was a "normal" oil change interval for cars back in the day. Right now the Compass computer seems to be on track to call for an oil change roughly every 8000 miles for my driving and usage (it's internal calculation varies depending on how you drive and in what conditions). I simply cut that in half, so when I first reached 4000 miles I changed the oil. Then at 8000 the computer threw up an oil change message and the dealer did it. Then at 12,000 miles I changed the oil again at home. At around 16,000 I expect the computer to put up a message again and into the dealer I will go. 4000 miles between each oil change, more than frequent enough to hopefully never have an issue with slight intended oil consumption and gasoline contamination that comes with less-tight piston rings, but long enough that I don't see it as a major burden (especially since I am only doing every other one). So far with the miles I drive this works out to the dealer changing the oil twice a year and me changing the oil myself twice a year. Whoopdido.

Obviously I'm one of the lucky ones. Mine only uses the tiniest bit, as was intended. I think where trouble really starts is for some of you, you get a motor that was already intended out of the gate to us a little oil, and you were unlucky enough to get an "extra loose" motor that was at the extreme end of the mass-production acceptable minimum tolerance range and all you need on top of that is for your rings to fail to seat a little bit the first few hundred miles and boom, you got yourself a very oil-thirsty engine.

The service and marketing and sales departments don't want to vocalize this intentional oil consumption thing too much, they know it sounds very bad at face value and that many of us will struggle a lot to come to the engineer's line of thinking that they have made a "good trade" in using a bit of oil to gain a bit of economy and power. They are between a rock and a hard place, the governments are legislating and demanding more and more efficient engines, this is one way to inch towards that goal, but they have to hope the average consumer never checks their dipstick and pays attention to what it was at 1000 miles ago. For 95%+ modern car buyers this is a safe bet to make, hardly anyone pays attention to their oil level nowadays. But they have opened themselves up to a percentage of their mass-produced motors being a little too loosey-goosey and still passing inspection and poor folks who get those unlucky motors are going to be really mad.

The thing is you can't hardly get away from this anywhere. Its not one lone car brand or company that is doing this. Any mass-produced car you buy from any branded lot could be a lurking lemon. Odds are in your favor but somebody is going to get the handful of bad ones.

My honest two cents, take it or leave it:

1) Start out with a lease. It doesn't have to be a long one, but long enough to give you time to know whether or not you have one of the "good ones". If you get stuck with an oil-consuming, poor gas mileage, faulty-electronics, lemony-peppered-pig then happily give it back to them at the end of the lease and you won't come out ahead but you won't be too far 'behind' if you know what I mean.

2) Seat those rings! Know somebody with a 1000-2000 pound boat you can borrow for a couple days? Hitch it up around the 600-mile mark and do some gentle but firm accelerations on a safe country road somewhere. Or load up the cargo area with bricks. Google "new engine ring break-in procedure" for some ideas maybe. A moderate amount of heavy load can help piston rings seat and seal, as best as they can anyways. You aren't supposed to have to do this on a new motor but I don't know what else to tell you, its worth a try, seems to have worked out ok for me.

3) Don't put anything but good quality full synthetic oil in your engine, especially early on in life. No slick-50 or anything hoaky like that. If you start playing guessing games with friction modifiers early in an engine's life because of something you read on the internet, your rings may never seat and you will have a life-long oil burner for sure.

If you have a motor you think burns wayyy too much oil (ie, those of you that get oil pressure lights on the dash) go get a compression test done. This is about the only non-invasive thing you can do to find out if your rings are having major problems sealing, assuming the valves all work as they should. This is also something solid evidence-wise that should hold up arbitration or court, or it may point towards a problem in another area. I haven't looked but I have a feeling its pretty tough to do a compression test on these engines so if someone ever gets that far, I'd be curious to know how it goes and how much of a pain it is with the design of the intake.

Alright I've typed way more than enough for now, I'm sure you are all very sick of me by this point but hey, my 2 cents is free. If it leads you to google around and learn something, great. If you learn that I am wrong and full of sh t, thats also great. I don't care too much since mine works really good so far (knock on wood) but I hate to see other people having such a bad time after putting out their hard earned money.
I'm still new to this website and reading through the laundry list of threads on these issues. I have a 2018 Leased Jeep Compass Latitude and am only just now finding out about all of this junk. For me, I worry it's too late and I'm screwed royally. I have ~10months left on the lease and not even 12k miles on the car yet. My engine has seized up at least twice while driving and they informed me there was no oil on the dipstick whatsoever.

Now, Let's say that I don't have as much experience and knowledge as you do @arudlang I'm only 26 and this is the first lease and brand new car I've ever owned. In all of the used cars I've had and in my '77 Camaro z28 I thought I've seen it all but have never once experienced anything like this Compass with electrical issues and these severe oil problems. How would I have known all of these "secrets" that I'm just finding out now? I was under the assumptions as well as "sold" on a brand new vehicle with top line safety and software to prevent any issues. How would I have realized any of this right off the starting line?! UGH i'm very frustrated and disappointed. But more importantly, what can I do ASAP so that I'm not entirely screwed when I go to turn the lease in and they try and pin any problems on me?? Appreciate any advice you can give!!!
 
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