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Hey guys, hope all is well. Hopefully someone can help me with this issue! A few years ago I bought a 2018 Jeep Compass Trailhawk that I love but I’m having this reoccurring issue concerning the oil.
When I hit 5k my oil change light never came on so I took it to the dealership to get a oil change. They told me since it was a new car the change oil light probably wasn’t triggered yet but it should come on the next time. The next time never happened! I’ve had 3 more oil changes since then my low oil light or my oil change light has never came on. At one point I even completely ran out of oil and the engine randomly shut off. I’ve contacted my dealership and now they are telling me that the 2018 model isn’t equipped with any oil indication features even though the manual clearly says that it does.
Has anyone had this issue? Does anyone have a 2018 Jeep Compass trailhawk that displays any low oil or oil change indicator? Thanks for the help!!
 

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I've had a 2018 (wrecked) and I'm still driving a 2019. On only one occasion has either thrown the oil change indicator. Compasses and most modern vehicles monitor the oil condition by computer, factoring in miles, age, and driving conditions. If you're constantly in hot city traffic the indicator will come on sooner, if you're a pretty easy driver in a moderate climate the indicator may not come on before you decide to change the oil anyway. The latter is probably your situation.

These do not have a low oil indicator (AND THEY SHOULD!!). Due to CAFE standards manufacturers are doing all they can to increase fuel economy and one of their "solutions" is to use thin oil and increase internal tolerances -- the result is that modern engines use far more oil than their predecessors did. I can't make it between oil changes without adding a quart of oil, but my 2019 does better than my 2018 did.

You've stumbled onto the dangerous part: since there is no low oil indicator, if it gets low it shuts down no matter where you are. It wants to save itself and doesn't care if you're making a left turn in front of a Mack truck when it decides to shut down. You could be in the worst neighborhood in the city or in a back mountain pass at midnight. You're stranded. Best solution is to check the dipstick at every fill-up.
 

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Hey guys, hope all is well. Hopefully someone can help me with this issue! A few years ago I bought a 2018 Jeep Compass Trailhawk that I love but I’m having this reoccurring issue concerning the oil.
When I hit 5k my oil change light never came on so I took it to the dealership to get a oil change. They told me since it was a new car the change oil light probably wasn’t triggered yet but it should come on the next time. The next time never happened! I’ve had 3 more oil changes since then my low oil light or my oil change light has never came on. At one point I even completely ran out of oil and the engine randomly shut off. I’ve contacted my dealership and now they are telling me that the 2018 model isn’t equipped with any oil indication features even though the manual clearly says that it does.
Has anyone had this issue? Does anyone have a 2018 Jeep Compass trailhawk that displays any low oil or oil change indicator? Thanks for the help!!
OMG I am thrilled to find out that I'm not the only one with these issues. I've had a laundry list of problems come out of my 2018 Jeep Compass which is a lease and I can't take it anymore. The fact that the dealership's service department has been so unhelpful to me is insane. I have had loads of electrical issues since day one of needing the vehicle jumped off the showroom floor only to have it return two days later for low batteries and Start/Stop function not working (Which to this day, over 2 years later, the Start/Stop still does not work and that is a whole other issue).
For me- I had my engine seize and shut off while I was driving TWICE, like you mentioned in your Original Post. I brought it in knowing I was due for my second oil change, given the message indicator had been on a few weeks, and they said there was "zero oil on dip stick" and it was only 7,512 miles since the last oil change. General consensus for Synthetic Oil life is between 7,500-10,000 miles and I dont even have 12k miles on the entire car yet?! And even so, I never had an oil light warning come on saying I had "no oil pressure" to even alert me to any problems.
Given this website threads, I'm only now finding out that the oil in this thing is consumed like a SOB but I was NEVER TOLD THIS. And before you reply your witty, sarcastic comments, I'm not an idiot about cars and with all of the other cars I've owned I have never had any issues with oil. Plus, I barely drive this thing as it's not my only car so I had no preexisting assumptions that I'd have any problems out of the ordinary.
Even worse, the dealership is now blaming me for possible engine failure and other electrical issues that have no relation. I am honestly furious and scared to approach the end of my lease to fear of what they are going to blame me for now.
I feel your pain incredibly @Christina.l.davis86 and i would see if your dealer is maybe more willing to work because so far what i've gathered is FCA doesn't do anything yet the class action suits and the complaints are definitely heard just not acted upon. It's quite sad.
 

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From what I've seen on here FCA has replaced some engines. My guess is that in those cases the dealership may have gone to work for their customer and got some action out of the corp. Some of that may be due to the customer's attitude in presenting their complaint. If the customer is respectful and is honestly seeking a remedy a reasonable service department ought to work with them. If the customer comes in swearing & tearing, they'll get nowhere. "You get more flies with honey than vinegar" assuming of course that you want flies. :sick:
 

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From what I've seen on here FCA has replaced some engines. My guess is that in those cases the dealership may have gone to work for their customer and got some action out of the corp. Some of that may be due to the customer's attitude in presenting their complaint. If the customer is respectful and is honestly seeking a remedy a reasonable service department ought to work with them. If the customer comes in swearing & tearing, they'll get nowhere. "You get more flies with honey than vinegar" assuming of course that you want flies. :sick:
I agree!! I think I have been more than nice especially having put up with it for over two years, but at some point I'm growing frustrated and feeling taken advantage of for not knowing these new cars and just assuming when they say they are going to fix something, they will LOL
 

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I think there is a grievance procedure in the owner's manual or in the paperwork you got when you bought it. My dealer kinda apologized when he gave it to me and said it was required but please give them every chance to make it right before I went that route. If you've tried and gotten nowhere maybe the grievance route is best.

Not FCA but GM helped me twice on transmissions that failed (86 Buick and a 97 Olds). Even though I was off warranty they agreed it shouldn't have happened and went half-way with me. They gave the transmissions and I paid the dealer to install them. In both cases the dealership knew I was legitimate because I was a regular customer there. It was the dealer who offered to go to GM with my problem and got their cooperation.

Maybe if you just went to the service manager and in an even tone explained your service history and asked if they could do anything to help you. It's in their interest not to lose a customer. In my cases above I continued to buy from that dealer. I was a sales rep on the road and while not a fleet buyer, I bought a new car every 2-3 years.

I'd save this for last but if your sale rep is still with the dealership (they move around a lot) s/he might want to sell you a car next time around and may go to bat for you. Tell your problem and say, "This is your chance to save a customer." See what they do for you.

Good luck and please keep us posted.
 

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I think there is a grievance procedure in the owner's manual or in the paperwork you got when you bought it. My dealer kinda apologized when he gave it to me and said it was required but please give them every chance to make it right before I went that route. If you've tried and gotten nowhere maybe the grievance route is best.

Not FCA but GM helped me twice on transmissions that failed (86 Buick and a 97 Olds). Even though I was off warranty they agreed it shouldn't have happened and went half-way with me. They gave the transmissions and I paid the dealer to install them. In both cases the dealership knew I was legitimate because I was a regular customer there. It was the dealer who offered to go to GM with my problem and got their cooperation.

Maybe if you just went to the service manager and in an even tone explained your service history and asked if they could do anything to help you. It's in their interest not to lose a customer. In my cases above I continued to buy from that dealer. I was a sales rep on the road and while not a fleet buyer, I bought a new car every 2-3 years.

I'd save this for last but if your sale rep is still with the dealership (they move around a lot) s/he might want to sell you a car next time around and may go to bat for you. Tell your problem and say, "This is your chance to save a customer." See what they do for you.

Good luck and please keep us posted.
I do agree that giving them chances is for sure the first step! The oil problem seems to need heavy duty fixes/new engine so timing wise I'm not sure I'd have the luxury to start a whole back and forth with them on "temporary fixes" that just delay anything until my lease gets up and i hand it in.
This experience does make me wonder how other manufacturers handle problems/legitimate concerns with customers. I'm sure this will not be my last encounter with issues in a car but it is my first so it makes me wary of sticking with FCA sadly.
I have heard other local dealerships treat customers far better and have been even more willing to just talk with me so it could be a bad dealership experience on top of everything. Stinks!
 

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I do agree that giving them chances is for sure the first step! The oil problem seems to need heavy duty fixes/new engine so timing wise I'm not sure I'd have the luxury to start a whole back and forth with them on "temporary fixes" that just delay anything until my lease gets up and i hand it in.
This experience does make me wonder how other manufacturers handle problems/legitimate concerns with customers. I'm sure this will not be my last encounter with issues in a car but it is my first so it makes me wary of sticking with FCA sadly.
I have heard other local dealerships treat customers far better and have been even more willing to just talk with me so it could be a bad dealership experience on top of everything. Stinks!
I've had good and bad dealers, about an equal number of both, but the bad dealers only ever sold me one car, the good dealers sole me several. It seems to me that bad vehicles bring out the worst in a dealer. How well they can address a problem determines how good they really are.

Long story here: I had a '93 Jeep Cherokee with a bad clutch. I first noticed it starting up at a stop sign near my house. It felt like the tires were on ice and suddenly gripped pavement -- sort of an instant thing, maybe a single tire rotation. If you've lived in northern latitudes you've experience it. I'm pretty careful about icy intersections and I hadn't noticed any ice there. Then I noticed it only did it at that first stop sign in the morning. A few weeks into ownership I noticed the clutch was mighty deep and then I was grinding gears. No dummy I checked the reservoir and it was low. Putting 2+2 together pretty well diagnosed the cause of the problem: fluid was dripping onto my clutch making it slip. Being a brand new vehicle I took it to my dealer -- this became a regular thing. After 4 trips to the dealer with them phrasing the problem differently (to escape lemon laws) and no solution I got rear-ended. I was out of town but had it towed to a Jeep dealer who farmed out the work to a real shady shop. They dragged it out until my insurance company got heavy-handed and then I got it back with an awful paint match. When the clutch problem happened again I said, "I'm done with this thing." As a sales & service rep on the road I couldn't cope with constant repairs and traded it to a different dealer after only 6 months. The advantage of ownership is I could do what I wanted. I told him straight out I couldn't stand the thing and they'd do best to wholesale it. I traded "down" from a new Cherokee to a new Cutlass wagon for about even money. That was one of the best cars I ever owned. :) Three years and 140,000 miles on nothing more than oil changes and tires.

Point of the story: if your dealer can't fix it, try a different dealer. "I'm a reasonable person and DealerX can't fix my problem. Can you?" If they can't, then get rid of the vehicle. It's not worth the stress to you or them.
 
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