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Pretty obvious even if I did it won't have made a difference, it was a lemon from the get go. To pacify you, yes I read the manual when I had it. Nowhere did it say I burn oil so please check me religiously. It has the same jargin that other auto manufacturers put in there for the sake of legalities to not drive it like you stole it and check your fluids now and then, not every day, not every week and certainly not every time you drive it.

Here is a snippet:

ENGINE BREAK-IN RECOMMENDATIONS A long break-in period is not required for the engine and drivetrain (transmission and axle) in your vehicle.Drive moderately during the first 300 miles (500 km).After the initial 60 miles (100 km), speeds up to 50 or55 mph (80 or 90 km/h) are desirable.While cruising, brief full-throttle acceleration within the limits of local traffic laws contributes to a good break-in.Wide-open throttle acceleration in low gear can be detrimental and should be avoided.THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE STARTING YOUR VEHICLE 83 The engine oil installed in the engine at the factory is a high-quality energy conserving type lubricant. Oil changes should be consistent with anticipated climate conditions under which vehicle operations will occur. For the recommended viscosity and quality grades, refer to"Maintenance Procedures" in "Maintaining Your Vehicle".


NOTE: A new engine may consume some oil during its first few thousand miles (kilometers) of operation. This should be considered a normal part of the break-in and not interpreted as an indication of difficulty.

^^^

"Some" oil, some in my definition would be maybe a half a quart, quarter of a quart not 5-6 quarts and certainly not 15 quarts like mine did in 10k miles. It only ate more as the miles went up. The OP is saying before the first 3k miles it ate all his oil, mine did the same. I'm still waiting for you to say that's normal. :popcorn: Anyone will tell you that it's not. You don't have to change the oil per the manual for 5k mile intervals. The OP, myself, and many others never got to that interval with mileage or date.

When that low oil pressure indicator comes up it means shes dry (less than a quart) but of course FCA cannot account to where that oil goes, it magically disappears. The Compass is clearly a magician.
I think it is quite obvious that they suggest you to check the oil in the first few thousand miles, which you did not. Even after the engine run dry, you still didn't check it. Lol you said it happened several times, I mean I would start checking the oil more frequently if something like this happened to me, and it sure wouldn't happen for a second time.

I am pretty sure if you maintained the oil level in the first 3-6k mile, oil consumption would stop or drop to very low amounts (which is the case for almost anyone here who maintained their oil level above low). I also got something like 1 qt consumption in the first 1000 miles or so, but since the 6-8k miles mark, I am getting zero consumption. You turned it into a permanent issue by repeatedly running the engine dry, which of course caused extreme wear and increased oil consumption over time. It is not normal for an engine to consume 5-6 qts in 3k miles, but if it consumes 1qt in 1k mile and you dont bother to add oil, it will be running with low oil that point forward. And this will in turn increase the oil consumption even more. So basically due to the wear of running on low oil, it can consume 1qt in the first 1k(which is normal for a new engine), 2qt in the next 1k and 3qt in the next 1k, which will add up to 6qt in 3k miles, but the 5qts are a result of owner negligence. This is what I mean by you ruined the engine.
 

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Either your thick in the head or just not listening. My old Compass, this OP or anyone in the world who owns this vehicle should not be subjected to adding oil ALL....THE.....TIME. It's not owner neglect. It's just a poor design. The oil was literally coming out of the EVAP tube, oil cap, and some who have added a catch can had full cans. I guess in your definition now your saying everyone who is experiencing this problem must be just neglecting the cars they drive. I mean your accusing me which is fine, I know I take care of my vehicles and am on the up and up with maintenance otherwise I won't have what I have. This is becoming more main stream for anyone who buys it.
 

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Either your thick in the head or just not listening. My old Compass, this OP or anyone in the world who owns this vehicle should not be subjected to adding oil ALL....THE.....TIME. It's not owner neglect. It's just a poor design. The oil was literally coming out of the EVAP tube, oil cap, and some who have added a catch can had full cans. I guess in your definition now your saying everyone who is experiencing this problem must be just neglecting the cars they drive. I mean your accusing me which is fine, I know I take care of my vehicles and am on the up and up with maintenance otherwise I won't have what I have. This is becoming more main stream for anyone who buys it.
Sorry but I consider it owner neglect if you cannot realize a car is running low in without a low oil pressure warning kicking in over a span of of 3k miles. It is simple as that. It is pretty standard operation to monitor the oil level of a new engine, if you cannot and run it dry, it is owner neglect. You dont need to add oil all the time, you need to add it maybe for the 1st 10k miles, and it slows down significantly after ~5k, so in total you wont need to add more than 2-4qt, unless you dont care, run it dry, damage the engine and complain. Than it will burn oil like there is no end to it.

I guess in your definition now your saying everyone who is experiencing this problem must be just neglecting the cars they drive.
People who figured it out early on (without a low pressure oil warning) are obviously not neglecting their cars. And if you check their thread, they also have less and less oil consumption overtime. But people who dont realize it without a low oil pressure issue are pretty much neglecting the car, check all the threads like this where people have extreme oil burning. They all said they got low oil pressure light at one point. So basically all of them never checked the oil level, run the engine dry, only realized the issue after low oil pressure warning and damaged the engine during all this. Than it will burn oil like there is no end to it.

Either your thick in the head or just not listening.
A side note, there is no reason to insult people over an argument. If you cannot handle it, you should not contribute to this forum.
 

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I know I've posted this before elsewhere on this site and maybe earlier in this forum. Mike, ya gotta realize any new engine will use some oil. That's been true since they've been making internal combustion engines. Rare is the engine that doesn't require some.

In my experience with my (late) Compass after getting 1,000 miles/qt up to about 10,000 miles, the consumption dropped to about 3000/quart by about 30,000 miles. More than I'd like, but as others have posted, all new engines are running on super-thin oil and with looser tolerances by design. That equals some oil consumption no matter what.

A low oil LEVEL light would be a good idea on all new cars. If the low PRESSURE light comes on, its doomsday. Park it, and if you're lucky you'll get away with it. If you drive on, even a short distance, you've probably killed it.

Anyone should check their oil on a regular basis. I check the oil in my lawnmower every time I use it.
 

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any new engine should not consume this much oil in such a short period of time, period. but since so many other manufactures are having and had this issue in the past, its now pushed as “normal”. (hence the amendment/update of oil consumption policies) If this was truly normal, why didn’t they put a warning system in the software to begin with? simple, its not, otherwise they would have better safe guards in place, like a "check oil" light every 1,000 miles. imo, poor quality control on engine parts and assembly. placing the (total) blame on the consumer, I think is unfair statement.
 

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any new engine should not consume this much oil in such a short period of time, period. but since so many other manufactures are having and had this issue in the past, its now pushed as “normal”. (hence the amendment/update of oil consumption policies) If this was truly normal, why didn’t they put a warning system in the software to begin with? simple, its not, otherwise they would have better safe guards in place, like a "check oil" light every 1,000 miles. imo, poor quality control on engine parts and assembly. placing the (total) blame on the consumer, I think is unfair statement.
You guys never heard the concept of engine break-in ever? New engines always consume more engines than older ones (until the engine becomes very old of course). So a check oil every 1k miles wont work because it wont consume that much of oil after say 10-15k miles. For some it can be shorter and for others it can be longer. But any owner should check the oil every 1k mile without needing a remainder, imo even 1k is a long period. I generally check the oil level of my cars every other week, even when neither consume any oil. My Grand Cherokee WK has 130k miles on it and never consumed oil, but I still check the oil level frequently. It is not something difficult or time consuming.
 

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For those of you with an oil burning problem, what has your typical drive been like? Mostly highway? Mostly city miles?

Perhaps one type of driving is more closely linked to oil burning. I think the oil change computer factors in engine hours and load into the calculation.

It could be that high hours on low mile city driving, idling, lots of acceleration and a slower average speed (high engine hours to miles on odometer) being a factor.

It may be the opposite with extended highway driving being the issue with longer periods where the engine is constantly working, not at idle and overall longer time frame while the engine is warm to burn oil.

I am just curious. I haven't had issues. I bought 5 quarts of oil on sale in anticipation of oil burn but have not had an issue so far.

Could be build quality but I think it could also be driving style and some applications will need to watch for oil burn more than others.
 

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I'm glad you check your oil every week but with a new vehicle you shouldn't have to be under the hood every week checking the oil. I worked for Chrysler in the 60's and 70's and we had a few cars that used oil but not the amount my 2018 Compass is using, 3.5 quarts in 3200 miles. My brother just retired from a Jeep dealership and he said there is a problem with the 2.4 engine. After you keep burning oil the next problem will be fouled plugs because the plugs can't keep up with the amount of oil coming into the cyclinder. So you can say what you want about checking oil I have owned a lot of Chrysler vehicle and never had an oil problem until the 2018 with a 2.4 engine. A new vehicle may use a little bit of oil in the first 1000 miles but after that it should not use oil. At the rate my car is using oil i'll never have to change it because it will change it own oil.
As a side note, I retired from a police department where as part of my duties I maintained a fleet of cruisers that we change to oil every 5K. In between oil changes we hardly ever had to add oil.
 

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Something feels really wrong with these vehicles that are using so much oil. After reading about this issue on the forum, I started watching and checking the oil level on my 2019 Compass Sport. I filled it exactly to the top mark on the dip stick to monitor and so far it has not used any noticeable amount of oil in the 1,000 miles since. Truck is 3 1/2 months old and has 3,500 total miles.

Baja-D
 

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I'm glad you check your oil every week but with a new vehicle you shouldn't have to be under the hood every week checking the oil. I worked for Chrysler in the 60's and 70's and we had a few cars that used oil but not the amount my 2018 Compass is using, 3.5 quarts in 3200 miles. My brother just retired from a Jeep dealership and he said there is a problem with the 2.4 engine. After you keep burning oil the next problem will be fouled plugs because the plugs can't keep up with the amount of oil coming into the cyclinder. So you can say what you want about checking oil I have owned a lot of Chrysler vehicle and never had an oil problem until the 2018 with a 2.4 engine. A new vehicle may use a little bit of oil in the first 1000 miles but after that it should not use oil. At the rate my car is using oil i'll never have to change it because it will change it own oil.
As a side note, I retired from a police department where as part of my duties I maintained a fleet of cruisers that we change to oil every 5K. In between oil changes we hardly ever had to add oil.
I responded to your post on another thread. Today's engines are made to a much different spec than the engines we all worked with a decade or two ago. Today's consumers want more power and the government is demanding better fuel economy. In the 1960s V-8 engines with twice the displacement were delivering only a little more power than the tiny litte 4-cyls in our Compasses and used twice as much fuel. I once owned a Ford Falcon with the 144 CID 6-cyl engine. Do the math and you will discover that is the exact same displacement as the 2.4L engine in our Compasses -- but the Compass delivers more than twice the power of my old Ford and slightly better fuel economy. And modern engines are choked with anti-pollution stuff that wasn't dreamed of back then.

Yet they deliver twice the power, better fuel economy, and run much cleaner. How do they do this?
  • Computer technology that didn't exist 50 years ago.
  • Fuel injection that only race cars had back then.
  • Reducing internal friction with looser tolerances.
  • Using thinner oil.
It should no surprise that when pushed to this extreme that there is a trade-off. Check around and you will discover that other manufacturers are dealing with similar oil consumption issues. Welcome to the 21st Century. Soon we'll all be driving electrics anyway.
 

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I too have had an oil usage problem since day 1 as well as electrical gremlins and water infiltration. I hired a lawyer and mine goes back under lemon law next week. Problem seems consistent with American models. Euro models (which can also get diesels) seem to be faring better
 

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....It should no surprise that when pushed to this extreme that there is a trade-off. Check around and you will discover that other manufacturers are dealing with similar oil consumption issues. Welcome to the 21st Century. Soon we'll all be driving electrics anyway.
I understand what you are saying but I question why many vehicles are OK. Mine has the same engine and oil as the others but has not used much oil at all in the first 4 months and 3500 miles. Seems like some other variable might be going on.

Baja-D
 

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my advise is if you buy any new car be sure to change the oil early at 3k. the original oil is break-in oil and will be contaminated fast.
change the oil and filter early. After the engine has broken it then you can follow recommended intervals or go sooner depending on severity of use,
 

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Nobody wins when car manufacturers try to save you gas when you have to spend more money on oil which is more expensive than gas. Plus evaporating oil causes more pollution. Blame the ****ing Democrat politicians who pretend to know everything about the climate, pollution and automobiles.
 

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Nobody wins when car manufacturers try to save you gas when you have to spend more money on oil which is more expensive than gas. Plus evaporating oil causes more pollution. Blame the ****ing Democrat politicians who pretend to know everything about the climate, pollution and automobiles.
Wow so many wrong ideas in one sentence. Burning oil will not cost you more since your are not burning engine oil equivalent to the amounts of gas. Having 30 MPG rather than 25 MPG would save someone ~70 gallons of gas in one year if they make 10k miles. That would cost something like $200-300 depending on where you live. You can buy 32 bottles of 1 qt motor oil for that (Pennzoil Platinum 0w-20). For oil burning to cost more than gas, the engine would need to burn 8 gallons of oil per 10k miles.

And no evaporating oil will not pollute more than exhaust gas. Evaporated oil will basically settle on its own and be degraded by bacteria. Even if we assume it is burned but not evaporated, it wont pollute more than what is equivalent to 70 gallons of gas.
 
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