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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello Kay20 . I did hear about some people having problem with the ball joints in this car. Some don't last more than 70 thousand miles. Fortunately I know what to do. My car now has over 110000 miles on it and the suspension is still great.
Here's the problem with the suspension and this is true with other makes also not only Jeep.

The new ball joints are sealed and they use a hard plastic "cage" for the "ball" and put very little moly grease. With millions of cars on the road they save money doing this but unfortunately it costs the motorists lots of money in parts and of course... labor. The solution is to add grease to the ball joints even the smaller ball joints they use on the anti-sway bar.

A grease gun fitted with a needle will be the best way. Do not worry about the grease leaking out. It won't. Water will not get in nor dirt as long as you put enough grease into it. You will see the rubber cup bulge out a little bit. This is good. Most importantly use the right grease! I recommend Castrol Pyroplex Blue. This is used in many heavy duty road building equipment and is guaranteed to perform well in any weather condition. As far as the smaller ball joints for the anti-sway bar, there are two for each wheel front and back.

Another important thing is that the inner tie rod joint actually wear out the fastest. So if any of the suspension ball joints are worn this inner tie rod joint will be too. Grease the outer tie rod joints also using this method. As for the inner tie rod joint. Remove the clip that holds the bellows and inject the grease through the space between it and the rod. Inject about 5 spoonfuls of grease for each side. The grease will reach the joint when you steer the car. You will enjoy a longer suspension life and nice quiet ride. No more clunking from the joints.

NOTICE: THIS WORK REQUIRES REMOVING THE WHEELS (FOR ACCESS) AND THEREFORE THE CAR HAS TO BE RAISED SAFELY WITH A GOOD RELIABLE JACK AND JACK STANDS. IF YOU CANNOT DO THIS WORK HAVE A MECHANIC OR SOMEONE FAMILIAR WITH THIS TYPE OF WORK DO IT FOR YOU. I HAVE MANY OTHER TIPS WHICH I WILL POST SOON. TKS
 

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thanks for the heads up, I'll have to talk to my mechanic about all the greasy dealings, because truthfully the only thing I know about vehicles is that they go vroom, car girl I am not :). But thanks again for the info

oh, btw I chose the deep cherry red for my compass (receiving it next week, so excited:D), only because I didn't like the maintenance of black, and well silver isn't cool enough for me, lol. I loved the red though...

bio for my compass:
cloth seats,
automatic CVT
sirius satellite radio group
Qucik order package 26E north edition (not sure what that means)
OWL all terrain tires--> Good year
and a full size spare,
oh and of course 4x4

Thanks again for all the information guys, I've really appreciated the help!
 

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The deep cherry red is a very nice color choice, gonna look great on your Compass!

- Cherokee
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hello Kay20

Regarding the tires. The Goodyear tires, the type Wrangler - SRA is a noisy tire and not so good but if you get the Goodyear ASSURANCE or the FORTERA then those are good. I will post more tips so keep in touch.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh I just noted that you are getting the 4x4. Yes, the OWL is made for 4x4. I guess you are planning to do some off roading?
 

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Hello Kay20 . I did hear about some people having problem with the ball joints in this car. Some don't last more than 70 thousand miles. Fortunately I know what to do. My car now has over 110000 miles on it and the suspension is still great.
Here's the problem with the suspension and this is true with other makes also not only Jeep.

The new ball joints are sealed and they use a hard plastic "cage" for the "ball" and put very little moly grease. With millions of cars on the road they save money doing this but unfortunately it costs the motorists lots of money in parts and of course... labor. The solution is to add grease to the ball joints even the smaller ball joints they use on the anti-sway bar.

A grease gun fitted with a needle will be the best way. Do not worry about the grease leaking out. It won't. Water will not get in nor dirt as long as you put enough grease into it. You will see the rubber cup bulge out a little bit. This is good. Most importantly use the right grease! I recommend Castrol Pyroplex Blue. This is used in many heavy duty road building equipment and is guaranteed to perform well in any weather condition. As far as the smaller ball joints for the anti-sway bar, there are two for each wheel front and back.

Another important thing is that the inner tie rod joint actually wear out the fastest. So if any of the suspension ball joints are worn this inner tie rod joint will be too. Grease the outer tie rod joints also using this method. As for the inner tie rod joint. Remove the clip that holds the bellows and inject the grease through the space between it and the rod. Inject about 5 spoonfuls of grease for each side. The grease will reach the joint when you steer the car. You will enjoy a longer suspension life and nice quiet ride. No more clunking from the joints.

NOTICE: THIS WORK REQUIRES REMOVING THE WHEELS (FOR ACCESS) AND THEREFORE THE CAR HAS TO BE RAISED SAFELY WITH A GOOD RELIABLE JACK AND JACK STANDS. IF YOU CANNOT DO THIS WORK HAVE A MECHANIC OR SOMEONE FAMILIAR WITH THIS TYPE OF WORK DO IT FOR YOU. I HAVE MANY OTHER TIPS WHICH I WILL POST SOON. TKS
This is good info I read something similar somewhere before. The youtube link is useful (It would have been better if it was a car or jeep used and not an ATV). I notice he stuck the needle through the rubber and with that some leakage may occur. Would that tinkering and grease void the warranty? The signs of this I am sure would be seen by the mechanic removing it in the event of failure.

This is more for the Moderators. This being an intro thread it would be much better to have the post moved into the Repair thread when others are much likely to see it and read. I was hesitant to post because it grow in the wrong area of the forum.
 

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Greasing

Funny thing, my '75 TR6 needs to be greased, has the nipples, this WAS the way it WAS in the "olden days" on OLD FASHIONED cars.
All along ALL the other cars (BMWs) I have owned have had sealed joints and bearings - no grease filling nipples, and NO special troubles.
Seems CRAZY that we should be now trying to figure ways to grease MOPAR's permanently greased parts.
Sure hope with 2011 - and all the upgrades to the Compass - that the suspension stands up to more than 40,000km.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No such thing as permanently greased parts believe me. The number one killer of mechanical parts is dirt followed by heat and no lubricant. Those so called permanently lubed parts rely on a plastic material that is supposed to be low friction. After a while, this plastic cage shrinks or get compressed and whatever little grease they put in it does not help as the spaces in between have enlarged. This results in looseness and noise. It gives you a terrible feeling because your low mileage car now feels like a clunker. When you add grease to your ball joints you prolong its life because even though you still cannot prevent the plastic from shrinking or compressing, the added grease helps to reduce wear and acts like a cushion between the ball and socket with the plastic cage still in place of course. The noise and looseness will be greatly reduced.
 
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