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I have a 2017 Jeep Compass that over the past year has had several major issues. While driving on a major highway my Jeep began to shut itself down due to the batteries failing. Several months later during the beginnings of covid-19, I was heading home near a major highway when my engine completely lost power due to oil leaking from the top. This resulted in needing a "new" engine being put in. And just last night, about 3 months after the "new" engine was put in, I got the message "Stop Safely Engine Will Turn Off Soon Message" and the check engine light came on. I was able to pull over and I turned the car off. I tried to turn it back on and the accessories would turn on but not the engine. I tried to jump it but still no power to the engine. I ended up getting it towed back the dealership that put the "new" engine in. Any ideas on what is going or what I can do would be greatly appreciated. I DO NOT feel safe driving this car now.
 

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The short answer is you should probably just fight with your dealership to get out of driving that car and into something else ASAP.

The longer answer is you probably either have a bad oil burning engine or a major electrical issue. Those are the two main things that tend to cause the major shutting down unexpectedly issues you describe. To narrow it down you need to start checking the oil regularly and documenting any oil you have to add between oil changes. You must do this properly and consistently, engine fully warmed up or fully cold each time, level ground, etc. Right after pumping gas is usually a good time.

If you determine its using gobs and gobs of oil, then your second engine is no good (if you really did get a second engine, I am skeptical myself whether you would know for sure). No good but you could survive driving it so long as you keep the oil topped off continuously, then it will not shut down in the middle of a busy highway and get you hurt or killed.

If you determine through a few weeks and 5-10 thousand miles that it isn't burning excessive oil then some kind of electrical issue is in there and it could be so many things it would be pointless to try to rattle them off.

If it dies again once you are safely able to do so you should check the oil at that point as well. If it dies on the road, and is full of oil, suspect major electrical issue. If it dies on the road and there is no oil on the dipstick, you probably have a big-time oil burner and need to top it off even more frequently to keep it going.

Either way its probably a lemon thats all but beyond fixing and you should try to get out from under it.
 

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The short answer is you should probably just fight with your dealership to get out of driving that car and into something else ASAP.

The longer answer is you probably either have a bad oil burning engine or a major electrical issue. Those are the two main things that tend to cause the major shutting down unexpectedly issues you describe. To narrow it down you need to start checking the oil regularly and documenting any oil you have to add between oil changes. You must do this properly and consistently, engine fully warmed up or fully cold each time, level ground, etc. Right after pumping gas is usually a good time.

If you determine its using gobs and gobs of oil, then your second engine is no good (if you really did get a second engine, I am skeptical myself whether you would know for sure). No good but you could survive driving it so long as you keep the oil topped off continuously, then it will not shut down in the middle of a busy highway and get you hurt or killed.

If you determine through a few weeks and 5-10 thousand miles that it isn't burning excessive oil then some kind of electrical issue is in there and it could be so many things it would be pointless to try to rattle them off.

If it dies again once you are safely able to do so you should check the oil at that point as well. If it dies on the road, and is full of oil, suspect major electrical issue. If it dies on the road and there is no oil on the dipstick, you probably have a big-time oil burner and need to top it off even more frequently to keep it going.

Either way its probably a lemon thats all but beyond fixing and you should try to get out from under it.
Thank you so much for all your feedback! Unfortunately my car is a lease and I have 3 months left. I also do not qualify as a lemon since I've had it for 3 years and I have 29,000 miles. When I had the engine issue I fought weeks with Chrysler, the dealership, and Jeep Care Team and no one would help. They refused to let me out of my lease despite my plea and feelings of being unsafe when driving.
 

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Try to keep the oil topped off these last three months and then let the lease go back. You may loose a small amount of money but also will unload a huge headache and your sanity is worth something too.
 

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Some things don't change. Like the Compass lack of quality as it gets older.
I said on another thread that it seems the problem is most common with the 2018s and earlier.
My 2018 used oil but over 30,000 miles it improved from 1000/qt to 3000/qt.
My 2019 is doing just fine. At most just a tiny bit. Not enough to add any between changes.
 

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I said on another thread that it seems the problem is most common with the 2018s and earlier.
My 2018 used oil but over 30,000 miles it improved from 1000/qt to 3000/qt.
My 2019 is doing just fine. At most just a tiny bit. Not enough to add any between changes.
You got a unicorn then.
 

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You got a unicorn then.
The oil burners are the rare ones, its just that (somewhat understandably) those who get the rare unfortunate oil burning ones tend to be very upset and loud and bitter about it for a long, long time. Sometimes even long after they get out of their oil burning vehicle (right mike? :p )

The overwhelming majority of these cars do not burn excessive oil. You'd see them on the roadside everywhere and actual active recalls would be well under way (not referring to rumors of recalls on small-name news sites).

Whether or not its confined to a particular year or stretch of years, we have debated this at length before, and I'm still convinced they all have roughly the same fraction of a percentage of them coming out of the factory in the oil burning state no matter which model year you are talking about. Once you include the Renegades, Chrysler 200, Dodge Dart, and low-trim models of the Cherokee that have all used this 2.4 liter motor you find oil burner examples in every single year that this engine has ever been produced. We have reports through the 2020 model year and I'm sure we will be hearing from 2021 model owners pretty soon.

Still, for every 10 oil burners there are tens of thousands of non-oil burners. That is the reality of the actual numbers, but sometimes it feels like a lot since as I said those who get them tend to be pretty upset for a long time.

And just a reminder, all the 2.4 liter engines burn some oil by design. The designed oil consumption is just a teeny tiny amount between oil changes. The engine is so mass produced some of them are outside of design spec on that consumption. Its part of helping reduce internal friction to get more power and economy out of a smaller motor. It is a common practice for any major auto maker on their mass-produced economy motors.

My 2017 does not burn an excessive amount of oil between oil changes just like most of them do not burn excessive amounts of oil, but it does use a tiny bit. Its honestly a pretty crappy economy motor but its built to a price and a production quota and in that regard its fulfilling its intended purpose in FCA's entry-level vehicles.
 

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My 2017 does not burn an excessive amount of oil between oil changes just like most of them do not burn excessive amounts of oil, but it does use a tiny bit. Its honestly a pretty crappy economy motor but its built to a price and a production quota and in that regard its fulfilling its intended purpose in FCA's entry-level vehicles.
I agree with most of your post but honestly I don't think the 2.4 is crappy. It's strong suit is the economy/power ratio. I'm averaging well over 30MPG, and on my summer tires I'm running 34MPG overall. While not a sports car it is well able to zip into traffic, courtesy of some low-range gears. I don't need to do that very often. When I do, as long as the start/stop is disabled, I have no problem. It can cruise comfortably at 70 and that is as high as the speed limit so what more do I need? It delivers good economy and enough power. It's not an econobox and it's not a sports car. I wasn't shopping for either extreme.

To me the real test of an engine's crappiness is how long it lasts. At 30,000 I am not qualified to evaluate it yet. Another 150,000 and I'll proffer my opinion.
 

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To me the real test of an engine's crappiness is how long it lasts.
I understand and respect our difference of opinion there. I think its crappy because its noisy and buzzy and unrefined, with very little torque and doesn't shine on economy either. At warm idle it ticks like a diesel sewing machine, on the highway it becomes very loud and dramatic during downshifts for acceleration and yet very little actual acceleration relative to the noise output, and it doesn't have enough torque to turn the top overdrive gears so its constantly downshifting for slight hills and breezes and that extra cabin noise detracts from the overall perception of quality.

To me longevity is supposed to be a given. In today's world even an economy motor should make it between 150k and 250k before it needs any major teardown if its cared for.

It can cruise comfortably at 70 and that is as high as the speed limit so what more do I need?
Well maybe the speed limit is 70 near your, its 75 a lot of interstates and some are even 80 MPH speed limit these days out in Montana. I'm glad yours works well at 70 because mine does not. As soon as I get over 65 it is evident that the wind resistance is overtaking the torque the motor can produce in 8th gear. On a windy day I will be getting 1-2 downshifts per mile just trying to cruise a set speed on the 4 lane highway, and like I said these downshifts are not particularly quiet or smooth so they detract from the experience. The legs are just too long on the Limited trim with that 3.73 axle ratio, it seems.

It's strong suit is the economy/power ratio. I'm averaging well over 30MPG, and on my summer tires I'm running 34MPG overall.
I'm not impressed, personally, by the power/economy of this motor. You want to see something truly impressive, take a 3.2 V6 (using the same ZF 9-speed) Cherokee like the one I happened to be driving 2 hours home from my sister's wedding this past weekend. Average for my drive home: 34 MPG. Now conditions were essentially perfect, and in the same conditions I have met or slightly exceeded that average for the same trip in my Compass but the point is Jeep has a motor that can deliver almost the same highway economy in a larger, heavier vehicle while also providing a hell of a lot smoother, quieter, and more performant experience.

We are promised economy in trade for performance with our 4 cylinder, but it doesn't actually deliver. Meanwhile this V6 is out in a bigger car and same transmission running quieter, smoother, a lot of the time just as light on sipping fuel as our 4 banger, and if you put your foot down it claws to shove asphalt behind it so fast I can hardly believe how quickly it can pickup speed on the highway.

From a performance and economy standpoint, there is no point or purpose to the 2.4 liter when this 3.2 liter also exists. Cost, emissions, etc are factors to some bean counter and government regulator somewhere but they are of no interest to me. If the V6 Cherokee wasn't a thing maybe the 2.4 Compass would look impressive but its an absolute joke compared to the V6 Cherokee. If we had a motor like that in our cars we'd use 9th gear and see some outstanding highway economy, but we'd be a long, long ways off on the target production cost for the vehicle and I get that too. It still seems like a shame though.
 

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At warm idle it ticks like a diesel sewing machine
Diesel sewing machines were before my time, but I do remember gasoline-powered wringer/washers (Maytag) and propane refrigerators (Kelvinator) In fact, Kelvinator is in the family tree of our Jeeps.

Buzzy, yes, but not like the World Engines in the 1st generation Compasses.

Agreed, 9th is pretty useless. It's just there to satisfy and equation for the EPA. Even 8th isn't very stable on the interstate, like you say it shifts in & out. Next time I make a long trip I'm wondering what if I notched it into 7 and left it there? 5th is a 1:1 ratio, so I'd still be in a second overdrive gear. There'd be no down-shifting except in the mountains, but probably not on rolling hills. Really most highways follow the river valleys so the grades are fairly modest. In 7th the engine wouldn't have to work as hard. I've got a long trip on the weekend, maybe I'll try this . . .
 

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The oil burners are the rare ones, its just that (somewhat understandably) those who get the rare unfortunate oil burning ones tend to be very upset and loud and bitter about it for a long, long time. Sometimes even long after they get out of their oil burning vehicle (right mike? :p )
Considering I know of at least three other friends/family who own a 2017, 2019 and a 2020 and they still burn copious amounts of oil I rest my case. I know of more that burn than don't burn. I can't say i've ever owned a car that requires you to buy a box of oil from Napa/Autozone/O Riley and check it every week 🤷‍♂️ It's an inherent engine flaw thats plagued FCA for more than a decade. The only vehicle that did that to me was a GMC with a 350 with bad ring lands on it. To be expected on a truck with 300k miles. Not a brand new one.

I just hate seeing people getting ripped off or accepting that this is OK. I was ripped off and of course I can be salty all I want. Nothing has changed since the new model came out. Just have to open my browser, go to this site and see bad batteries, peeling trim, wonky radios, oil burning motors, electrical issues where it don't start, auto start/stop that has a poor design, crap sway bars, the list goes on. If your paying 25-40k for this car the quality should reflect on it.
 

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Next time I make a long trip I'm wondering what if I notched it into 7 and left it there?
I've done this on a lot of windy days out of necessity but never thought of it on a calm day.

I had to make a 2 hour drive a number of times over the last few weeks to go to a specific suit store to get fitted for a wedding;

On the first trip that day was very windy and before I had made it 5 miles on the four-lane it had already downshifted in and out of 8th about ten times, and the 11th time it downshifted I angrily slapped the autostick over to lock it in 7th and said "stay there, then! You _blankety_blank_piece_of_junk!" and proceeded to drive the rest of the highway to the city in 7th. It averaged 26 MPG on the leg there in 7th gear. On the leg home it was later into the evening and the wind had died down a bit, didn't have to use autostick so it was mostly in 8th. Also averaged 26 MPG going home.

Then the following week made the same trip on a mildly windy day to the same store for some additional tailoring on that suit, but that trip was in a V6 Cherokee which got (drumroll) 26 MPG round trip.

Lastly, I made one more of those trips last week to pick up the suit and bring it home and this was a calm cloudless day with no wind at all, the Compass did 28 MPG with no use of autostick.

My impression is that if it never used 8th gear at all I would rarely see any meaningful difference in per-tank fuel economy. 8th has only been useful to me in good weather with a tail-wind on flat ground. It definitely is quieter as far as noise/vibration/harshness goes 8th vs 7th but fuel economy in those gears seems very similar.
 
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