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Greetings,

The tires on my 2020 Jeep Compass Latitude calls for pressure of 35 front and 32 back (17 inch). I've kept to this, but was wondering of there is a more ideal tire pressure? I wouldn't mind having the same tire pressure for all 4 wheels. Thoughts on this question? Thank you.
 

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Greetings,

The tires on my 2020 Jeep Compass Latitude calls for pressure of 35 front and 32 back (17 inch). I've kept to this, but was wondering of there is a more ideal tire pressure? I wouldn't mind having the same tire pressure for all 4 wheels. Thoughts on this question? Thank you.
It has a lot to do with weight distribution...The front is heavier, therefor higher tire pressure. Look under "Standard Features", "Capacities and Weights" like this example from a 2021 Compass Freedom..
CAPACITIES/WEIGHTS
  • Capacity/Weights - Fuel Tank Capacity13.5
  • Capacity/Weights - Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) Not Available
  • Curb Weight - Automatic Trans Not Available
  • Towing Capacity - Maximum Not Available
  • Weight Distribution - Automatic Trans - Front 59.0
  • Weight Distribution - Automatic Trans - Rear 41.0
 

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The tires on my 2020 Jeep Compass Latitude calls for pressure of 35 front and 32 back (17 inch). I've kept to this, but was wondering of there is a more ideal tire pressure?
Well it turns out us bunch of geniuses here have so far not come up with any better working pressures than the ones the team of highly paid engineers at Jeep laid out for us originally ;)

That being said, we don't have any of those engineers at my local dealership service department and every time I went in for a free oil change the boys in there would set them all to 35, front and back. Never seemed to be an issue, but in this case seems very likely to me that the slightly lower pressure in the rear is to help with traction on the lighter end of the car. I don't think you would loose much noticeable cornering performance if you set them all to 35 it should be fine, but for best all around handling the engineers seem to believe dropping a couple PSI at the back is best. I don't think its really hardly noticeable unless you have touring/grand touring tires on. Then again, the ABS with anti-trailer sway and the stability control system are all tuned assuming the recommended tire pressures are being used so, there's that.

I just run the recommended pressures. Mine are actually too high now because I had added air during winter and now its heating up, pushing 40 cold on the fronts and I think I can feel the increased stiffness of the ride and some reduced cornering (but have to note that all the roads are still dusted with sand here from winter, and the tires are now one year older and harder, etc).
 

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Recommended tire pressures are based on industry standard load/pressure tables, and the vehicle's axle ratings. Manufacturer's will then often spec higher pressures for fuel economy.

My Compass is rated GAWR(front) 2600 lb., GAWR(rear) 2380 lb. It has 225/60R17 tires. Looking at the load tables, it would be fine at 26 PSI all around. And, that's basically where the TPMS is set to warn (28/26 PSI). The tire placard says 35/32.

Like many things (0W-20 oil is another), an increase in fuel economy often overrides what would otherwise be correct.

If you want to run them all at the same pressure, I'd go with 32, for the better compliance/traction, especially if you typically don't carry full loads.
 
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