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Good Afternoon, I am looking to purchase a jeep compass limited. I've been reading the comments, concerns, reviews and I just want to know, when all is said and done... Would you purchase your Jeep Compass again?
 

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Kinda depends I guess. For a mostly road-oriented vehicle that is comfortable, handles good, looks good, nice interior and nice features... the Limited trim is a good choice and probably one of the better options on the market for the most part. A Limited trim V6 Cherokee is definitely better, though, if you can afford it (and if you can get over the boat-like front end of the Cherokee).

When I bought my Compass the Cherokees still had some of the worst looks, the front end was terrible and the license plate was down low on the bumper making the tailgate look stupider than heck. Now it is slightly improved, the Cherokee still has a boat-like front end but its a bit better, and they moved the license plate to the tailgate and that helped a lot at the back. Most Cherokees still look stupid, but, if you can find one with the high altitude package they black out basically all the trim and it kinda mutes all the worst asthetic features of the Cherokee, and it becomes somewhere between palatable and actually good-looking. A basic Latitude Cherokee or even a Limited one has this issue where the chrome accents are highlighting all the worst parts. With High Altitude those things become less noticeable. Much more power in a V6 Cherokee (no V6 option with the Compass, the 2.4 is anemic), and more features especially with that High Altitude package. But if you can't swing a High Altitude or TrailHawk Cherokee the Latitude and Limited are too derpy looking (in my opinion). Yes they are a fuzz bigger but not drastically so. My wife has a 2020 Cherokee (High Altitude, obviously) and I have a 2017.5/2018 Compass (Limited) and beyond all shadow of a doubt the V6 Cherokee is a better car all around.

But if the Cherokee is not for you, Limited or High Altitude in a Compass is pretty sharp and more affordable (somewhat). Gets dicey with the Latitudes, not a fan of their rims and they are all random grab-bag as far as features go since everything is an extra option on a Latitude while at least with a Limited or High Altitude you for sure get a baseline of nice upgrades.

I love black, and the High Altitude gets a black headliner whereas everything else (like Limited) has a white-ish headliner. We loaded a tall, rusty firepit grill thing and put a rust stain on my white headliner in my Compass within the first few months of owning it. Black just looks sharp. But high altitude can be hard to find and hard to get a deal on it. Limiteds are pretty much everywhere and easier to wheel and deal.

For the money, the Compass is a good car. If mine got smashed tomorrow, I'd probably be shopping for a V6 Cherokee Trailhawk, just because I've found I actually use it hard enough towing, hunting, traveling forest roads, etc that a Trailhawk would be a good fit for me and the boost of having that V6 would be a game changer. It would have to be a Trailhawk Elite though to get all my creature comforts and at that point going to be pretty expensive. If I'm still on the budget I was on in 2017/2018, a Compass might be all I could swing and that would be fine but it would be a Limited or a High Altitude. Trailhawk in the Compass is a joke/appearance package, I just ran my Limited trim Compass on some public land forest roads in Wisconsin last weekend and had no troubles with the areas I wanted to explore.

The one thing I would maybe do different either way would be springing for or holding out for one with the panoramic sunroof. I didn't get the sunroof on my Compass, we got it on the Cherokee, and its pretty darn nice.

Speaking of options, no matter what you need to make sure you are buying one that has EVERYTHING you want out the gate. It is a huge expensive pain to upgrade these after the fact if you decide later you want the factory towing package/receiver, the bigger better radio, power lift gate, etc. There is pretty much nothing on this car that is cheap and easy to upgrade other than maybe the floor mats. I do not recommend buying one with the 5 or 7 inch radio thinking later you will buy the big 8.4 and swap it in. Some people have fought their way through that, but at great expense and waste of time. Just get it the way you want it from the start.

In 2017/2018 the Compass had a clear lead, Cherokee was still ugly. Now if you explore the Cherokee trims and packages you will find some are not so ugly, if you find one that looks good (like an all-black High Altitude) and have a few more thousand it is for sure a better built, better designed, more capable vehicle. Just test drive one and see (but only test drive a Limited or higher, Latitudes and lower will keep that bad taste in your mouth). If you can't find a non-ugly Cherokee the Compass is still a good car at a good price as long as its Limited on up (or a fully-loaded Latitude if you are willing to piecemeal it into a well-equipped conglomeration).

If you eliminate the Cherokee at present I'd have to at least test drive a Bronco Sport, since its out now and all shiny and new. I'm not even a Ford guy, I'd just have to look since cars are expensive and I have them for years on end usually. On paper the Bronco Sport is better than a Compass for certain, but mainly where it comes to off road, so more the Bronco Sport off road trims vs the Compass Trailhawk. Not sure how the Bronco Sport competes with the road-oriented Compasses, Jeep's interiors are usually better. Just to be clear, don't get the Bronco mixed up with the Bronco Sport. Two totally different vehicles. Even though I'd test drive one, I'd expect to still prefer a Cherokee, but vs a Compass I'm not so sure. Price would play a factor.

Ultimately, if someone T-bones me today in my 2017.5 Compass Limited and totals it out, no, I would not turn around and buy a new 2021 Compass. I like it and plan to drive it many more years if nobody does T-bone me and it doesn't fall apart, but whenever its day comes I will be replacing it with something else. I don't regret getting it though, best of what was available and what I could afford at the time.
 

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Long story short, I did. After getting a 2019 Compass Limited it was totaled by a pothead who was high as a kite on the highway. The Compass protected me well and within a week I picked up another 2019 Compass this time fully loaded minus Beats,Sunroof, and hid headlights. Love my new Compass and would recommend....
 

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I would...and get a 4X4 version this time. :)
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Kinda depends I guess. For a mostly road-oriented vehicle that is comfortable, handles good, looks good, nice interior and nice features... the Limited trim is a good choice and probably one of the better options on the market for the most part. A Limited trim V6 Cherokee is definitely better, though, if you can afford it (and if you can get over the boat-like front end of the Cherokee).

When I bought my Compass the Cherokees still had some of the worst looks, the front end was terrible and the license plate was down low on the bumper making the tailgate look stupider than heck. Now it is slightly improved, the Cherokee still has a boat-like front end but its a bit better, and they moved the license plate to the tailgate and that helped a lot at the back. Most Cherokees still look stupid, but, if you can find one with the high altitude package they black out basically all the trim and it kinda mutes all the worst asthetic features of the Cherokee, and it becomes somewhere between palatable and actually good-looking. A basic Latitude Cherokee or even a Limited one has this issue where the chrome accents are highlighting all the worst parts. With High Altitude those things become less noticeable. Much more power in a V6 Cherokee (no V6 option with the Compass, the 2.4 is anemic), and more features especially with that High Altitude package. But if you can't swing a High Altitude or TrailHawk Cherokee the Latitude and Limited are too derpy looking (in my opinion). Yes they are a fuzz bigger but not drastically so. My wife has a 2020 Cherokee (High Altitude, obviously) and I have a 2017.5/2018 Compass (Limited) and beyond all shadow of a doubt the V6 Cherokee is a better car all around.

But if the Cherokee is not for you, Limited or High Altitude in a Compass is pretty sharp and more affordable (somewhat). Gets dicey with the Latitudes, not a fan of their rims and they are all random grab-bag as far as features go since everything is an extra option on a Latitude while at least with a Limited or High Altitude you for sure get a baseline of nice upgrades.

I love black, and the High Altitude gets a black headliner whereas everything else (like Limited) has a white-ish headliner. We loaded a tall, rusty firepit grill thing and put a rust stain on my white headliner in my Compass within the first few months of owning it. Black just looks sharp. But high altitude can be hard to find and hard to get a deal on it. Limiteds are pretty much everywhere and easier to wheel and deal.

For the money, the Compass is a good car. If mine got smashed tomorrow, I'd probably be shopping for a V6 Cherokee Trailhawk, just because I've found I actually use it hard enough towing, hunting, traveling forest roads, etc that a Trailhawk would be a good fit for me and the boost of having that V6 would be a game changer. It would have to be a Trailhawk Elite though to get all my creature comforts and at that point going to be pretty expensive. If I'm still on the budget I was on in 2017/2018, a Compass might be all I could swing and that would be fine but it would be a Limited or a High Altitude. Trailhawk in the Compass is a joke/appearance package, I just ran my Limited trim Compass on some public land forest roads in Wisconsin last weekend and had no troubles with the areas I wanted to explore.

The one thing I would maybe do different either way would be springing for or holding out for one with the panoramic sunroof. I didn't get the sunroof on my Compass, we got it on the Cherokee, and its pretty darn nice.

Speaking of options, no matter what you need to make sure you are buying one that has EVERYTHING you want out the gate. It is a huge expensive pain to upgrade these after the fact if you decide later you want the factory towing package/receiver, the bigger better radio, power lift gate, etc. There is pretty much nothing on this car that is cheap and easy to upgrade other than maybe the floor mats. I do not recommend buying one with the 5 or 7 inch radio thinking later you will buy the big 8.4 and swap it in. Some people have fought their way through that, but at great expense and waste of time. Just get it the way you want it from the start.

In 2017/2018 the Compass had a clear lead, Cherokee was still ugly. Now if you explore the Cherokee trims and packages you will find some are not so ugly, if you find one that looks good (like an all-black High Altitude) and have a few more thousand it is for sure a better built, better designed, more capable vehicle. Just test drive one and see (but only test drive a Limited or higher, Latitudes and lower will keep that bad taste in your mouth). If you can't find a non-ugly Cherokee the Compass is still a good car at a good price as long as its Limited on up (or a fully-loaded Latitude if you are willing to piecemeal it into a well-equipped conglomeration).

If you eliminate the Cherokee at present I'd have to at least test drive a Bronco Sport, since its out now and all shiny and new. I'm not even a Ford guy, I'd just have to look since cars are expensive and I have them for years on end usually. On paper the Bronco Sport is better than a Compass for certain, but mainly where it comes to off road, so more the Bronco Sport off road trims vs the Compass Trailhawk. Not sure how the Bronco Sport competes with the road-oriented Compasses, Jeep's interiors are usually better. Just to be clear, don't get the Bronco mixed up with the Bronco Sport. Two totally different vehicles. Even though I'd test drive one, I'd expect to still prefer a Cherokee, but vs a Compass I'm not so sure. Price would play a factor.

Ultimately, if someone T-bones me today in my 2017.5 Compass Limited and totals it out, no, I would not turn around and buy a new 2021 Compass. I like it and plan to drive it many more years if nobody does T-bone me and it doesn't fall apart, but whenever its day comes I will be replacing it with something else. I don't regret getting it though, best of what was available and what I could afford at the time.
I do like the way they look and all the as -is features, which is why I keep coming back to the Compass as an option to purchase. As far as reviews, they aren't strong. I read that Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep just hasn't turned out the vehicles they used to. I want reliable and I know Jeep has a strong following of loyal customers, which is why I ask. Thank you for all the info!!!
 

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I agree almost 100% with arudlang's comment, except for the parts of not liking the Cherokee's stylings, but that's in the eye of the beholder. I traded in a 2016 Cherokee with the high altitude blackout treatment and 2.4L 9-speed on a 2019 Compass Trailhawk. The trade was mainly because the Compass had things that the wife wanted and I have come to love (remote start, power liftgate, different color), my only requirement was 4X4 (Cherokee was FWD).

End of the day, if I had the opportunity and funds to instead get a Cherokee with the options that I found on the Compass, I would go that route. It's not that I have had bad experiences with the Compass by any means, but the overall ownership experience of the Cherokee was just better.
 

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Ditto @19Limited. My 2018 Compass came to a similar end. It was totaled because all the airbags deployed. Other than bruises from the airbags, we were unhurt. I also bought another Compass.

My Compass is comfortable on the highway, the cargo space meets my needs, and the fuel economy is great. I reported elsewhere on this site that on a recent 200 mile trip I averaged 35.5MPG driving 65MPH on the interstate and 55MPH on the state roads. I've averaged 31.6 overall in 50,000 miles of driving. Most of my driving is on rural roads or highways; very little city driving.

My only complaint is that the touchscreen responds sluggishly -- a real driver distraction.
 

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I want reliable
Jeep/Dodge/Chrysler is probably not for you then, sorry to say. Hanging out at the dealership for stupid problems that never should have occurred is our pastime and how we keep up with one-another in the area. Check out Honda CRV/Passport or Toyota Rav4 if you want a boring plastic-interiored box with hard seats that will run for thousands upon thousands of miles with nothing but oil changes.
 

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The 1999 CRV in my driveway is at 300,994 miles as of today and wouldn't die if I shot it straight through the grill with a 357 magnum. Sure is a rough, no frills ride compared to my Compass, though!
 

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I would absolutely buy another 6spd manual transmission Latitude if I could get one. No more manual available though, so I would be looking for a low miles used model. 20k miles on ours just over one year since buying. Has treated us perfectly well with not one issue. We live remote, our driveway is more of a 4x4 trail than most jeeps ever see. 30-35mpg most of the time. We added a tow package in a few easy hours, and it does fine for what it is. First vehicle I've ever achieved 26mpg while towing something with.
 

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Jeep/Dodge/Chrysler is probably not for you then, sorry to say. Hanging out at the dealership for stupid problems that never should have occurred is our pastime and how we keep up with one-another in the area . . .
Tough to be you. :( I'm at 50,000 miles and nothing more than oil changes. I sold my Patriot two years ago at 280,000 miles and as of last night when I saw the guy I sold it to, it's still on the road.
 

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Tough to be you. :( I'm at 50,000 miles and nothing more than oil changes. I sold my Patriot two years ago at 280,000 miles and as of last night when I saw the guy I sold it to, it's still on the road.
Well we've discussed this before but once again, 50k miles is peanuts. Its not an accomplishment for a car to make it to 50k. Call me when you reach 280k like your Patriot, which I needn't remind you is a totally different car built essentially by a totally different company. There are no "Jeeps" save for the Wrangler itself, all others are just rebranded cars from sister-in-law brands and its a different new "sister" every few years due to an awful lot of parent marriages and divorce... Nothing about a Daimler/Mitsubishi Patriot making it to 280k suggests our Fiat Compass are going to do the same.
 

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Well we've discussed this before but once again, 50k miles is peanuts. Its not an accomplishment for a car to make it to 50k. Call me when you reach 280k like your Patriot, which I needn't remind you is a totally different car built essentially by a totally different company. There are no "Jeeps" save for the Wrangler itself, all others are just rebranded cars from sister-in-law brands and its a different new "sister" every few years due to an awful lot of parent marriages and divorce... Nothing about a Daimler/Mitsubishi Patriot making it to 280k suggests our Fiat Compass are going to do the same.
I expect a vehicle to go 100,000 without problems and 200,000 without drivetrain issues. After 200,000 we have to realize things will wear out. Some will go a lot further, others are aggravating from the get-go. I've only had one lemon in my life (20+ vehicles that all reached 100,000 and some approached 300,000. As an outside sales/service rep I racked up the miles. Most were highway miles, but it was usually fully loaded because I was using a station wagon for a truck. Typically 100-150,000 and I was done with it. Let someone else deal with the suspension or tranny issues. I had pretty good intuition about when to let go.

As for the Compass making it that far, my biggest concern are the electronics. However, these are new and largely unproven in the long term. I'd be curious to know how many 2nd Gen Compasses have made it to 200,000. I'd be over 100,000 except my first Compass got totaled.

I think I'll start a thread for high mileage Compasses. No trolling, please. ;)
 

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Good Afternoon, I am looking to purchase a jeep compass limited. I've been reading the comments, concerns, reviews and I just want to know, when all is said and done... Would you purchase your Jeep Compass again?
Mine a 2018 manual Sport with appearance group, heated seats and wheel ...YES! $ 20,400 OTD.

Picked it up at the dealership, never been back. Change my oil, check all fluids, keep it clean and protected, pay attention, no CEL's I'm happy.

Too much electronic crap, burning oil, tranny shift (9 Spd) issues with higher level models.

I read (here) about lemons, guess I got a cherry and bet there are many like me that don't post BS issues because they read the owners manual.

So many one post members that whine and ask questions, maybe they should get off their a--es and read little or perhaps should not own a vehicle.

" Dude what are the biggest wheels, I want a 4' lift, how do I fit an 8.4 inch screen" kinda funny, yet sad.

Do some research, buy the right vehicle and leave it alone is a good place to start.

Enjoy the balance of the day.
 

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The same people who want 9spd automatics don't want to read the owners manual, and want answers spoon fed to them online instead.
 

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Yes and Yes. I'm on my fourth orange Compass. Keeps getting better and better each time.
 
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